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Author Topic: Today's cancelled card at Hawthorne  (Read 1863 times)
APCD Dan
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« on: November 16, 2005, 07:34:44 PM »

Why did Hawthorne even run three races today in this weather and on that surface?  Yes, they are in the business of racing, but you cannot run with this kind of situation.  It is getting to be wintertime in the midwest and you have to accept some down days when you run at this time of the year.  Another jockey was killed today in Ohio, I do not see the need to make this job more dangerous than it already is.

Both today and Sunday should have never started.  They weather was bad at the beginning of each day and predicted not to get any better during the day.  We do not need to put horses and jocks out there to see if they survive.

This industry does not need to create more problems than they already have, especially when lives are involved.  Fittingly, racing goes back before Congress to explain jockey welfare tomorrow.

While I mention Hawthorne here, my point is really addressed to all tracks, including Arlington which runs races during lightning strikes in the summer.
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Thomas Graham
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« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2005, 07:59:39 PM »

From what I've been told by reliable sources, the jocks were consulted before either card began, and in both instances the jocks were willing to give it a go. 

On Sunday, after three races the jocks begged off and managment agreed.  Today, the jocks met with trainers, the stews and management before the races and they agreed to start the card.  As the temps dropped further, the track clumped beneath the surface and that's why the jocks stopped.  In this case, management appeared to try to persuade the jocks to ride given the amount of time before the cancellation was announced.

Dan, I know you speak the truth when you say this isn't a Hawthorne thing as it goes on at all winter tracks this time of year.

My big gripe is when managment tries to persuade the jocks to ride.  To me, if the jocks say "no go", then it's "no go" --- then you talk about how to get the track ready for the next day. 

On the other side, if the jocks feel it's unsafe, they shouldn't say "we'll ride a couple and see what happens" because once the card starts, the fans and horsemen are expecting to get the card in.  Of course, if things change during the day, that's another story, but when conditions don't change you shouldn't cancel once a card starts.

TJG
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Armonsol
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2005, 08:10:01 PM »

Hoosier Park no contest race, cancellation

ANDERSON, Ind. - A spill in the first race and winter weather resulted in a no-contest being declared and led to the cancellation of racing after the third race at Hoosier Park on Wednesday evening.
In the first race, a maiden claiming event going one mile Version, ridden by Hector Rosario Jr., came out over heels, clipping another rival and falling entering the first turn. The stricken horse then got back up with a broken leg and came upstretch, collapsing on the inner rail about 100 yards beyond the finish line. As the rest of the field raced into the stretch, outriders waved off the riders and the field was pulled up before reaching the wire. Cape Fear also suffered a catastrophic injury later in the first turn and was pulled up on the backstretch.

Stewards declared the race a no-contest. Rosario was reportedly transported by ambulance to Anderson Community Hospital and no further information was available.

The track was listed as muddy for official Equibase results charts although the postings on the infield tote board and television monitors listed the track as fast. The track condition was listed as frozen on Equibase charts for the third race with temperatures dropping into the teens. Following the third race, the riders voted not to continue due the deteriorating and unsafe condition of the track.
 
Case in point.
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edwardwilliam
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2005, 12:37:08 AM »

Question: (and not a smart ass one) how come the standardbreds can run easily in this weather, but not the flats?

Differing gait?  Differing race scenarios?

Best,
EW
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2005, 12:57:47 AM »

All you have to do is ask yourself Ed the final times for a mile. Flats average: 1:37. You tell me what your average is. Anyone can walk in a snowstorm.
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CLOCKERTERRY
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2005, 12:18:49 PM »

Question: (and not a smart ass one) how come the standardbreds can run easily in this weather, but not the flats?

Differing gait?  Differing race scenarios?

I think flat racing is inherently more dangerous. The jock is travelling faster, sitting higher above the track, don't have the stability of the cart, and is only barely hanging onto the horse by his toes through the stirrups. They fall off easy enough as it is whenever a horse veers suddenly. A sudden blast of wind or large clump of frozen dirt in the face that unbalances horse or jock could cause the same problem.

Not to say harness racing isn't dangerous, I've seen some spectacular pileups replayed on TV.
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Dan Nance
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2005, 12:28:33 PM »

I think flat racing is inherently more dangerous. The jock is travelling faster, sitting higher above the track, don't have the stability of the cart, and is only barely hanging onto the horse by his toes through the stirrups. They fall off easy enough as it is whenever a horse veers suddenly. A sudden blast of wind or large clump of frozen dirt in the face that unbalances horse or jock could cause the same problem.

Not to say harness racing isn't dangerous, I've seen some spectacular pileups replayed on TV.

That is why the t-breds should get the hell off the backside of Hawthorne during Jan. and Feb. so that harness racing can run their two month meet with double headers like it was for decades.
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Stat Man Steve
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2005, 01:08:16 PM »

A good portion of it is the depth of the cussion, usually 3" to 4'" which, when freezes and thaws occur, can ball up and form ice chunks.  Read somewhere that some of the riders were coming back with broken goggles yesterday.  On other cards, they've had bloodied and sometimes broken noses from getting hit with the flying chunks. 

Not sure if that happens as much in Harness.  I could be wrong, but I thought they use a 1" cushion. 
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CLOCKERTERRY
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« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2005, 01:30:53 PM »

That is why the t-breds should get the hell off the backside of Hawthorne during Jan. and Feb. so that harness racing can run their two month meet with double headers like it was for decades.

Have the owners of Hawthorne championed this idea to the IRB, only to have it shot down by the thoroughbred horsemen? I don't think I have ever heard or read anything about Hawthorne wanting those winter dates back. 

I don't see what this has to do with the discussion anyhow. It is about why thoroughbred racing gets cancelled when standardbred doesn't. There is no thoroughbred racing in January and February, just training. That gets cancelled all the time by the trainers when the weather is bad and the track in poor condition.
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medic_61353
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« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2005, 03:24:37 PM »

I know that Standardbreds land on two hoofs, regardless of trot or pace. T-Breds land one hoof at a time. Standardbreds are also shod for winter tracks. Small borium dots on the shoe for ice.
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jrstark
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« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2005, 05:52:02 PM »

Also drivers don't have the same weight issues, so they can dress warmer.  Jockeys can't wear anything bulky or heavy.
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