Chicago Barn to Wire Breeders' Cup Handicapping Tournaments
Home | News | Bloggers | Forums | Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Contact Us | Search


October 25, 2014, 10:12:40 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you don't remember your password, email me.

New  registration procedures -- Some ISPs have been bouncing the verification emails.  Please email me to be activated or if you have any problems.  Click Contact Us above.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Oldest Harness Driver  (Read 1224 times)
Ruffie Guru
Guest

« on: November 21, 2012, 12:18:02 AM »

http://www.harnesslink.com/www/Article.cgi?ID=102052

Nice Article about Leo Burns
Report to moderator   Logged
3 wide and wingin
Guest

« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2012, 12:22:35 AM »

Alvin Callahan is 74 and still rolling along at Rosecroft.

And hes not unusable by any means. Hits the ticket alot.
Report to moderator   Logged
No Gate Speed
Newbie
*
Posts: 19




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2012, 12:51:06 AM »

Walter Young is a few years younger and still drives randomly on the Ohio fair circuit. 94ish if I remember correctly
Report to moderator   Logged
fuzzypants
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 9416




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2012, 07:52:56 AM »

Ruffi guru Thank u for such a wonderful story!
This is what harness racing is truy about!
What horses realy give us in life ,a peace a reason of being and the joy to keep on keeping on!
Some people measure talent different than I but to have the patients stamina  to develop the art of this beautiful horses that's where true horsemen ship is at any horses level is talent to me talent of a horsemen!
What's amazing about that video the grandstand was full and I saw  No whipping!
Thanks for sharing please give us more!
« Last Edit: November 21, 2012, 08:00:08 AM by fuzzypants » Report to moderator   Logged

" when I get got , I get my Glock"
wilderness
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3873




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2012, 08:29:28 AM »

Historically speaking (at least before the advent of today's bikes, lack of hub rails and sub-1:55 miles) what prevented reinsmen (or women) from competing was the loss of their eyesight.

 Given the modern technology of optometry has allowed reinsmen to compete longer.

 However and historically, there were still some very aged reinsmen.
Report to moderator   Logged

Regards Don
fuzzypants
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 9416




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2012, 09:12:03 AM »

Historically speaking (at least before the advent of today's bikes, lack of hub rails and sub-1:55 miles) what prevented reinsmen (or women) from competing was the loss of their eyesight.

 Given the modern technology of optometry has allowed reinsmen to compete longer.

 However and historically, there were still some very aged reinsmen.
Also I noticed no one leaning back in their bikes like a spoiler on a NASCAR !
Guys setting up hands in front of them realy a wonderful video!

Wilderness are you talking about that star wars stuff?
Laser surgery?
Report to moderator   Logged

" when I get got , I get my Glock"
Croft
Full Member
***
Posts: 213




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2012, 09:30:48 AM »

Alvin Callahan is 74 and still rolling along at Rosecroft.

And hes not unusable by any means. Hits the ticket alot.


No.

You're confusing Alvin Callahan with Alvin Lineweaver.
Report to moderator   Logged
the exactorman
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4311




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2012, 09:36:09 AM »

Walter Young is a few years younger and still drives randomly on the Ohio fair circuit. 94ish if I remember correctly

I hope my memory is correct. I believe its Walter Young who wont do interviews to discuss driving, harness racing, etc?
Whether its him or not takes nothing away from Walter's accomplishments, but it annoyed me when i read the article (when I say article, I do NOT mean this post/article, I mean another article from a while back) because people wonder why the game never generates interest. When given a chance to be interviewed the guy says "I do not do interviews"....
« Last Edit: November 21, 2012, 09:39:56 AM by the exactorman » Report to moderator   Logged
wilderness
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3873




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2012, 11:15:49 AM »

Quote
Wilderness are you talking about that star wars stuff?
Laser surgery?

fuzzy,
       that's one method.
They been doing those incision cuts (fish eye) on eyes for some 25-years now.
However the cataract surgeries and other surgeries simply weren't available 30, 40 or 50 years ago.

 Even the technology for corrective lenses (glasses and contacts) have improved vastly.

 In the early 1960s, my grandfather lost an eye and had a transplant that never took. Today some of these eye transplants are working.
Report to moderator   Logged

Regards Don
wilderness
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3873




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2012, 11:19:30 AM »

There were many accidents (decades ago) (even people dying) because a drivers vanity wouldn't allow him to admit to the general public that he couldn't see.

 The horsemen who drive against these near-blind drivers were aware and simply stayed out of their way. Course race-styles were different and race-times were slower, allowing for more reaction time.

 They should have an eye-test directly next to the Breathalyzer at all tracks.

 It also wouldn't be a bad idea to require an annual physical (it's done for CDL's) including testing of reaction time.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2012, 11:21:37 AM by wilderness » Report to moderator   Logged

Regards Don
JLB
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 280




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2012, 12:09:59 PM »

You are correct about vanity. I can think of three drivers, none of whom are currently competing. Two of them had distinct vision problems, esp. at night, and the third had lost alot of function in his right hand-I had asked him one day why he would start a race with the whip in his left hand, then switch later to the right. He told me that he had trouble holding pullers because of an old injury to his right hand.
Report to moderator   Logged
fuzzypants
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 9416




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2012, 01:34:39 PM »

You are correct about vanity. I can think of three drivers, none of whom are currently competing. Two of them had distinct vision problems, esp. at night, and the third had lost alot of function in his right hand-I had asked him one day why he would start a race with the whip in his left hand, then switch later to the right. He told me that he had trouble holding pullers because of an old injury to his right hand.
I'm so glad unthought that up .
About night driving.
Ive noticed many instance that I've wandered about the glare and shadows at night.
Not only the older guys but even the younger ones!
Report to moderator   Logged

" when I get got , I get my Glock"
Slim Russ
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2012, 01:46:50 PM »

The trainer-driver era featured a lot more of the older drivers. In the early 1970s Sach Werner was still driving his small stable of horses on the RR/YR circuit. He was in his early seventies at the time. Sach started at RR in 1945.

Earle Avery was still racing the LB, Brandy, Atlantic City circuit when he was seventy-seven. His greatest win came in the 1963 Cane when he won overland from the seven with Meadow Skipper, beating the seemingly invincible Overtrick in a TR :58.1. He also beat Overtrick with Skipper in the Poplar Hill that year at The Red Mile in a WR :55.1. He was sixty-nine at the time.

Sanders Russell was also competing on that Delaware Valley circuit in the 1970s. He was in his seventies then. Russell was in his mid to late sixties when he campaigned Fresh Yankee.

Del Miller drove Castleton Magic, a Prakas filly out of a daughter of Delmonica Hanover, in a BC elimination when he was seventy-six.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2012, 02:01:59 PM by Slim Russ » Report to moderator   Logged
JLB
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 280




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2012, 03:39:27 PM »

I remember Hugh Bell driving at Atlantic City when he was a senior citizen.
Given that alot of drivers switched only to trotters as they got older, I wonder if the prevalence of trotting hobbles today would make them think twice about that choice, given that, back then, a free-legged field of trotters presumably gave them confidence that if a horse went off-stride, the straps would not precipitate a fall and an accident.
Report to moderator   Logged
Slim Russ
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2012, 04:33:37 PM »

When Bill Haughton was killed while driving the two-year-old pacer, Sonny Key, in a Sheppard elimination in July, 1986, Stanley Dancer, who was 59 at the time, swore off driving pacers in races. He still trained them, but would not sit behind one in a race.
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.09 seconds with 16 queries.

Home
Upcoming events
Arlington Million
Horse slaughter in IL
Racing TV schedule
News Updates
Legislation

Galloping Out

Previous stories

Arlington
Balmoral
Hawthorne
Maywood
Chicago Sun-Times
Chicago Tribune
Blood-Horse
Daily Racing Form
Thoroughbred Times
Harness Link
Illinois Racing Board

 

2014

Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2013

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2012

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

More ebay items

 

Home | News Updates | Bloggers | Forums | Search
Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Advertising | Contact Us

Copyright © 2000-2014 Chicago Barn to Wire. All rights reserved.
Privacy policy