Chicago Barn to Wire
Home | News | Bloggers | Forums | Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Contact Us | Search


November 28, 2014, 01:08:51 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you don't remember your password, email me.

New  registration procedures -- Some ISPs have been bouncing the verification emails.  Please email me to be activated or if you have any problems.  Click Contact Us above.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Sore Feet  (Read 25094 times)
fuzzypants
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 9416




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2011, 01:53:43 PM »

It has taken quite a bit to get this poor horse of mine over his feet we are starting back to race now Thank you one and all.
Report to moderator   Logged

" when I get got , I get my Glock"
ruckerfan
Full Member
***
Posts: 129




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2011, 05:20:58 PM »

Hey fuzzy there's a product out called magic cushion best product ever for feet put it in every racehorses feet day before race works Winders
Report to moderator   Logged

keep the fight up ken it ant over i hope u useing the rope a dope im getting worried!!!
MercedesMan
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 334




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: March 07, 2011, 06:32:40 PM »

The first thing i would do if i were you is find out why he has Sore Feet before i go doing all of this stuff for know reason because if it is a coffin joint none of this will do any good. BUT if he has a abcess or a gravel some of this may work but not all number 1 if i remember right DMSO may and can come up positive on a state test so if that is the case ax the dmso. What i would do if i were you is ask your vet and see where the trouble is first

If it is just basic foot trouble i would poultice his feet with  a nice poultice after you tube his feet for no less then 1 hour. tube them with epsonsalt and hot water to what he can stand. hot water is the key to tubing a horses feet not warm but HOT water. and if he races for any kind of money that means the first thing i would do is block his feet before he races the block will last for around 3 weeks so that is 3 good races out of him before you have to do it again sometimes all you have to do is block them once and they come good after you work on him. if you do not wish to block his feet you can do some thing that has worked for around 40 years and wow does it work right before you go into the paddock take a box of mothballs melt them down to liquid and then wrap a towel around his coronary band so none of the liquid goes into his heels and poor the liquid in the bottom of his foot ONLY make sure you cover the hole sole of the foot till it glazes over then go racing good luck let me know how much he paid

Your friend BLS

and remember if your horse is broke i can fix him just ask any time you wish horsemen helping horsemen is what its about
« Last Edit: March 07, 2011, 06:39:31 PM by Black Label Society » Report to moderator   Logged
Buggyboy
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1249




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: April 07, 2011, 01:25:10 PM »

  Tubbing followed by packing feet with cotton soaked in ether/iodine solution done up with vetwrap. Alternate days with poultice pack.  Guaranteed results used on several top trotters in the past......
Report to moderator   Logged
fuzzypants
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 9416




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: April 07, 2011, 01:49:53 PM »

  Tubbing followed by packing feet with cotton soaked in ether/iodine solution done up with vetwrap. Alternate days with poultice pack.  Guaranteed results used on several top trotters in the past......
Thanks buggy boy.
I also found the epsom salt in the green stuff with cotton another good poultice so my groom says I just took it to him and said check it out.
Report to moderator   Logged

" when I get got , I get my Glock"
Buggyboy
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1249




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2011, 02:00:29 PM »

Thanks buggy boy.
I also found the epsom salt in the green stuff with cotton another good poultice so my groom says I just took it to him and said check it out.

  Please let me know how this goes.  This treatment is effective so long as we have gotten the shoeing aspect all straightened out, of course.  Blacksmiths of second rate quality can quick a horse easily, and only growth (stimulated with Reducine on coronets...)can fix that.....
Report to moderator   Logged
fuzzypants
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 9416




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2011, 03:07:22 PM »

Hey fuzzy there's a product out called magic cushion best product ever for feet put it in every racehorses feet day before race works Winders
I agree it works very well the best trotter at Calexpo uses this all the time and he doesnt belong to me. But the owner is a big believer in it and the shoer would get so mad cause he said it was so hard to get off the hooves and shoe the horse.
Report to moderator   Logged

" when I get got , I get my Glock"
MercedesMan
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 334




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2011, 09:08:36 PM »

I read a recent article in HoofBeats about a trainer who treated a horse with severe sore feet!  He packed the feet with baby diapers???  How can baby diapers help sore feet? 
If the horse is any count and you want to race every week the only thing to do is in ject and tube pulitce and repet
Report to moderator   Logged
intothewild
Newbie
*
Posts: 8




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2011, 08:52:12 PM »

what about a horse with seedie toes, what would be the best treatment to prevent the feet from getting worse?
Report to moderator   Logged
BabyFireFly
Guest

« Reply #34 on: July 29, 2011, 08:47:07 AM »

what about a horse with seedie toes, what would be the best treatment to prevent the feet from getting worse?

The short answer to that would be to treat the cause and not the symptom.

You’d have to classify as to what degree the hoof is infected, which basically could be divided into two categories. Seedy toe brought on by an injury where the infection is confined to the damaged area would be an acute case - immediate, diligent treatment by a skilled farrier along with consistent aftercare to clear up the infection usually solves the problem. However, when significant wall separation comes into play, it’s more of a chronic issue and puts you in a whole other ball field. Has the horse had a resection? That’s the main question - and if not, should he?

I think the bottom line issues to keep in mind when dealing with ST or WLD with wall separation are 1.) A highly skilled farrier who understands the necessity of having a horse land properly while in motion, rather than finding the perfect balance when the horse is standing square on a flat surface. 2.) The horse’s environment - rapid fungi growth that comes with warm, moist conditions usually effects hooves, skin and lungs - which is also why we see so many horses come up with “summer sickness” - constant respiratory infections, skin conditions, etc. 3.) Diet - something that a lot of people do not think about, but is a major factor.

Anyway, I would find out exactly what the degree of separation is, and whether or not there is any rotation. Hooves with a large degree of separation are usually going to need resection. A horse that is not shod properly or does not receive regular trims every 4-6 weeks, that is allowed to constantly land incorrectly could have quite a bit. Heel first landings allow the frog to do it’s job, otherwise the coffin bone is continually driven lower into the capsule. Avoid trimming the frog and shorten up those toes.

Stamping out any known metabolic issues and preventing them to begin with are important. Really look at what you are feeding and make sure that you are not slowly poisoning your horse - I see it all the time, the “more is better” theory that defies all common horse sense. Equally important is the environment in which the horse lives. You don’t want a horse with this condition standing out in the morning dew, or hanging out in a moist stall all day….and the practice of washing and greasing day in and day out aren’t going to help.

Really those three things all need to be kept in mind, if you don’t pay attention to one, you might as well ignore them all. There are products on the market that are very good at treating the symptoms, and in many cases they are useful….things like White Lightening (my favorite) and Clean Trax - both products do not destroy live tissues, so they do not create more food for the enemy.
Report to moderator   Logged
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #35 on: July 29, 2011, 11:05:30 AM »

  My old riding mare was plagued with seedy toe.  After a couple years of various treatments including my racehorse farrier's help with bar shoes, etc. I finally gave up and figured it was something I could keep from getting worse but never cure.  Went back to barefoot.
  A parade was coming up and she's a jigger/dancer.  I started riding her up and down the paved road so she'ld get used to the surface and hopefully not get stupid during the parade.  Lo and behold after a week I started noticing a difference in her feet.  Long story short.. I continued to incorporate some road time during my rides and the hoof eventually grew out. Never had a problem since.
  Whatever the pavement does, it hardens and toughens the hoof up.  I try to time my shoeings now so I can get as many days as possible in between races barefoot, and I bring the horse home and pony or handwalk on the pavement. Barron came back with hoof rebuilder on all 4 hooves a year ago.  Hooves are great now.
Following pictures are from August 2010.  I'll try to get a current one to compare what they look like now.
This is right after the shoes were pulled when he first came back from Jersey.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2011, 11:24:37 AM by OldGreyMare » Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #36 on: July 29, 2011, 11:06:52 AM »

2 weeks later after being properly trimmed and going barefoot... lungeing on grass, handwalking 20 minutes a day up and down the paved road.



« Last Edit: July 29, 2011, 11:25:54 AM by OldGreyMare » Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #37 on: July 29, 2011, 11:08:15 AM »

Sole after the initial trim.  All the rotten excess crap was pared away but the sole is still too soft and rotten.
Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #38 on: July 29, 2011, 11:09:08 AM »

Sole 2 weeks later.  Hard and tough.

Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #39 on: July 29, 2011, 11:22:42 AM »

  That's only 2 weeks.. imagine the rehab if you had longer to work.  In the last picture you can see the beginnings of the callous around the toe.  Horses (riding horses) that I've had the luxury of time with have actually developed a callous that is almost like a shoe around the whole rim.
  It's my opinion the hoof rebuilder is the worst thing you can put on a horse's hoof.  What with daily baths there's too much moisture getting on the hooves and the rebuilder traps it.  What do you find under that stuff when it falls off or gets taken off?  Rotten hoof.  However; I understand the necessity for the "quick fix" on racehorses and the blacksmiths crying they "have nothing to nail into!" so.....
   It's also my opinion that hoof grease is WAAYYYY overused and the reason the hoof walls fall apart in the first place, necessitating hoof rebuilder..... at what? $300 a pop?  And who exactly is telling you to grease the feet so they're not so hard?  hmmmm?
Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #40 on: July 29, 2011, 11:39:10 AM »

  Regarding BFF's comment "allowing the frog to do its job"...  one of the frog's main functions is to act as a circulatory pump as it expands and contracts when coming into contact with the ground.  Something it is not allowed to do when there are shoes nailed on the feet. 
   Again my big beef:  why we can't have track surfaces with more of a cushion ala Europe/Scandinavia so we too could have the option of racing barefoot.  What is this freakin obsession with the teletimer?
Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
BabyFireFly
Guest

« Reply #41 on: July 29, 2011, 11:50:24 AM »

When my now 29 year old OTTB was 24 he was living with another retired horse out on soft grass. His feet were getting progressively worse and the farrier I was using at the time kept insisting that he was sore because he needed front shoes. I called a woman who taught the "barefoot method" and she came out for a look. She trimmed him up and told me that most farriers these days just know how to shoe them, and going barefoot means just pulling the shoes - not giving any thought to "readying" the hoof to be in a natural state. She requested that I hand walk the old horse on the pavement in the driveway as much as possible...after a few weeks, the soreness went away.
Report to moderator   Logged
King Nothing
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1737

Goodtimes




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: August 01, 2011, 10:15:58 AM »

There's a supplement feed additive called ez pellets that i have used for sand cracks/weak walls and it worked wonders. Blue Seal feeds sells it for about $17 dollars a 50lb bag and it takes 3-4 months to really see an effect but it really worked on one i had with shelly feet. Stopped losing shoes and tearing the walls apart. Also toe clips help as well if your blacksmith does it right. The pellets have high biotin level, vit E and methionine and horse loved to eat the pellets so they get it all.
Report to moderator   Logged

Then it all crashes down
And you break your crown
And you point your finger
But there's no one around

King Nothing
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #43 on: August 01, 2011, 01:08:38 PM »

  yeah I feed a supplement too.  I always liked Source.  Anything with biotin, same difference.  Problem nowadays not too many keep a horse around long enough to see any improvement so they don't bother with anything. It's all about the quick fix. Let the consequences be someone else's problem down the line.
Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #44 on: August 14, 2011, 11:54:09 AM »

  Here's what that right front looks like now almost exactly a year later.  I have before/after of the other hooves.... the right front just happened to be the worst.

Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #45 on: August 14, 2011, 11:55:28 AM »

  Side view where all that rebuilder was thought to be necessary.  Are they hard?  Yes.  Do I get grief from my blacksmith over that?  Sure do... nothing a coffee and a muffin can't fix, though.

« Last Edit: August 14, 2011, 12:00:02 PM by OldGreyMare » Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
intothewild
Newbie
*
Posts: 8




Ignore
« Reply #46 on: August 30, 2011, 08:47:51 PM »

Im looking for some idea's on best way to grow out a hoof...?
Report to moderator   Logged
OldGreyMare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1271


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #47 on: August 31, 2011, 05:37:16 AM »

 Source is my preference but any of the hoof supplements... Horseshoer's Secret etc.
 
Report to moderator   Logged

Check out my Facebook Page:  Flo Browne Horsemanship Training
Buggyboy
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1249




Ignore
« Reply #48 on: August 31, 2011, 04:51:45 PM »

Im looking for some idea's on best way to grow out a hoof...?

  To just stimulate growth of otherwise normal foot I always used Reducine on coronets......
Report to moderator   Logged
swoopdaddy
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2115




Ignore
« Reply #49 on: August 31, 2011, 06:52:04 PM »

Im looking for some idea's on best way to grow out a hoof...?
for me the best product is balsam of peru to stimulate growth. a little pricey but well worth the extra cost. mix it with a little fish oil to make it more appliable. apply to just the coronary band . not the whole hoof as the periople needs to breathe. grows a foot faster than anything ive ever used. problem is, why the bad foot in the first place? fix that problem and the rest will fall into place.  http://www.jacksmfg.com/details.asp?product_id=249
« Last Edit: August 31, 2011, 07:53:40 PM by swoopdaddy » Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.106 seconds with 17 queries.

Home
Upcoming events
Breeders' Cup
Horse slaughter in IL
Racing TV schedule
News Updates
Legislation

Galloping Out

Previous stories

Arlington
Balmoral
Hawthorne
Maywood
Chicago Sun-Times
Chicago Tribune
Blood-Horse
Daily Racing Form
Thoroughbred Times
Harness Link
Illinois Racing Board

 

2014

Breeders' Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2013

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2012

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

More ebay items

 

Home | News Updates | Bloggers | Forums | Search
Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Advertising | Contact Us

Copyright © 2000-2014 Chicago Barn to Wire. All rights reserved.
Privacy policy