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Author Topic: Equipment questions  (Read 9218 times)
jrstark
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« on: July 15, 2010, 09:22:06 AM »

Are these blinkers under a gauze hood?  Does it always go under the bridle? Is all the fuzzy/scrunchy for looks or comfort?  Why full ear covers, how does that compare to plugs?

This is Fox Valley Click winning last night:

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BabyFireFly
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2010, 01:49:32 PM »

The picture is cut off on my view, but that "gauze" is a screen...depending on how much cover you need, you can get them light colored or black. It's basically a fly screen, same material and closures. It obscures their vision and helps a hot or nervous horse. I always put them under the race halter and bridle to keep them in place.

The full ear hoods can be used alone or with cone inserts. They offer more sound elimination.

The "fuzzies" can just be for style or to prevent rubs from the buxton on a thin skinned animal.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2010, 01:51:11 PM by BabyFireFly » Report to moderator   Logged
fuzzypants
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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2010, 11:34:48 PM »

 It also looks like pen stripes on a f laughing guy
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2010, 09:30:49 PM »

The fly screen can also be used on a horse that doesn't like dirt hitting them in the face.

The horse is trained by Joel Smith, and most of his have red fuzzies on the breast collar. All those fuzzies make for a lot of extra work.

The filly shows making a lot of breaks leaving the gate, so I would guess the fly screen and ears are to calm her down behind the gate. Using a hood with ears you can really block out the noise. Stuff the ears with cotton, then the rubber cones over the ears , and hold it all in place with the hood.

After a few starts you may see her racing with pull out ear plugs. Keep her calm early, but then pull the plugs late in the mile to get her back fired up to finish.
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I am just an old "Hoss" trainer, that has been raced hard and put away wet. 
As my Friend from Maine(Ora Stratton) says "There are horse trainers, and then there are real "Hoss" trainers.
BabyFireFly
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« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2010, 06:08:44 AM »

I can't see her mouth on my screen, but I'd guess a mini bit would be a great possibility on this type of horse as well. Maybe even a tack noseband to go with that tie down.

She is certainly wearing lots of "stuff"....but Looking is right, once she starts consistently staying flat and settling down, it should come off....like a kid going from a tricycle, then training wheels and finally a plain old bicycle.

 
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« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2010, 09:11:35 AM »

  I'm not criticising or trying to tell anyone how to rig their horses but I find it curious that no one seems to use harsher check bits anymore.  I see all this equipment meant to control a hot horse... and then there will be a chin strap or plain check.  I like to open them up so they can see and hear, but have that check bit for control.
   My favorite rigging, because of my lack of strength, was always a 4 ring with a crit davis.  If my horse grabbed on, I had the help of the 4 ring leverage, and when my horse gave to me, I could give back and they'ld be rewarded by being able to could get their heads down and relax.  Also a big fan of the double bar crabbe (sans 4-ring).  I felt I could let them go with a more comfortable lower head, but yet restrict them from hogging down and choking if they grabbed on.  Good tools for teaching a horse to give and respond to your hands.  Of course, you'ld have to have light hands for these bits to be most effective.
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BabyFireFly
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« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2010, 11:33:00 AM »

One of our pacing mares came rigged to the gills, but no wins. After trashing all the all the extra "stuff" and adding a 4 ring, she went on to win 18 heats in one year...with an amateur driver.
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Dee
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2010, 11:18:20 AM »

Trotters are funny, you have to make them comfortable. Also Joel Smith is a great trainer and does very well for himself!
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tankin
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« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2010, 07:28:53 PM »

for the most part harsh bits are and should be a thing of the past.ive had horses for over 20 yrs and i can count on one hand a horse that a harsh has helped.they most always make them worse.
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« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2010, 07:49:57 PM »

I hate harsh bits. I have taken tons of equipment off of horses over the years and it has paid handsome dividends for me. Nevertheless, I have a wonderful horse that I can't hold.  I put a dog chain on him and he is jogging like a gentleman.  I trained him two trips in thirty evenl rated last week and I have high hopes.   Before the dog chain.I couldn't jog him in thirty.
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BabyFireFly
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« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2010, 06:44:20 AM »

I have a trotter who came to use with a warning, don't jog withouta chain...his jaw has even been fractured from what I suspect was a steering bar.

Anyway, I wheeled him until his mouth healed and worked on his manners on the ground. Now he goes in a latex wrapped rubber snaffle and plain latex wrapped overcheck.

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« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2010, 02:58:20 PM »

  A bit is only as harsh as the hands using it.  A heavy handed person should not be sitting behind a horse, period.  Give and take.  When a horse gives to you, you give back.  Sit by any track and watch the horses going by.  Watch how many people jog with a death grip tug of war going on.  Lead hands.

  BFF aint that groundwork something?  Especially the lateral flexion.  How come almost every person who rides knows it, but barely anyone in the harness business?

  Give me any horse that's a runaway bad puller and I guarantee in 1 month I'll be jogging that horse no headcheck snaffle bit no problem.
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tankin
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« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2010, 04:19:59 PM »

  A bit is only as harsh as the hands using it.  A heavy handed person should not be sitting behind a horse, period.  Give and take.  When a horse gives to you, you give back.  Sit by any track and watch the horses going by.  Watch how many people jog with a death grip tug of war going on.  Lead hands.

  BFF aint that groundwork something?  Especially the lateral flexion.  How come almost every person who rides knows it, but barely anyone in the harness business?

  Give me any horse that's a runaway bad puller and I guarantee in 1 month I'll be jogging that horse no headcheck snaffle bit no problem.
ogm weve had our disagreements but that comment about harsh bits is the dumbest thing ive ever heard.if someone feels the need to put a double wire on a horse that horse is probably pulling said persons guts out.what do you think you put it in and the horse is instantly not gonna grab.thats a stupid statement.im sorry.the hope is and the reason these bits are used are that we hope they will respect the harshness of the bit and settle down a bit.to say a light handed person can jog a horse with a harsh bit and the horse not resent it makes me wonder about your knowledge.
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servicetech
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« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2010, 08:35:59 PM »

hey be honest here,,the reason for the complete blindfold on the winning horse was so he wouldn,t know the stands were empty on his winning performace night,what a shame
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fairgame
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« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2010, 09:55:47 AM »

ogm weve had our disagreements but that comment about harsh bits is the dumbest thing ive ever heard.if someone feels the need to put a double wire on a horse that horse is probably pulling said persons guts out.what do you think you put it in and the horse is instantly not gonna grab.thats a stupid statement.im sorry.the hope is and the reason these bits are used are that we hope they will respect the harshness of the bit and settle down a bit.to say a light handed person can jog a horse with a harsh bit and the horse not resent it makes me wonder about your knowledge.

The dumbest thing I've read is that you think the process of give and take works in an instant and that you think a horse that needs to progress to a harasher bit once the damage is done because his mouth has become calloused to the easier one used with a heavy hand won't also develope a tolerence to the hrsher on if you hang on it. Horses think their best option is to run away from pain or discomfot until and unless they are taught differently.   That's why their response to hitting their hip on a doorframe is to run through the door, not to be more careful not to hit their hip next time.
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Dee
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« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2010, 11:46:48 AM »

If we are still talking about the horse in the picture, he is wearing a plain snaffle and a straight over check. the mask  is to keep the horse from worrying about the stuff that's around him.
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« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2010, 01:08:51 PM »

ogm weve had our disagreements but that comment about harsh bits is the dumbest thing ive ever heard.if someone feels the need to put a double wire on a horse that horse is probably pulling said persons guts out.what do you think you put it in and the horse is instantly not gonna grab.thats a stupid statement.im sorry.the hope is and the reason these bits are used are that we hope they will respect the harshness of the bit and settle down a bit.to say a light handed person can jog a horse with a harsh bit and the horse not resent it makes me wonder about your knowledge.

 As usual you either intentionally or out of stupidity totally misunderstood what I said.  What else is new? 
  Yes, a harsher bit in the hands of a light handed person can be a great tool.  In the hands of a lead-handed person (and by your inability to understand what I said, it's obvious you're one of those) it could make a horse flip over backwards.
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BabyFireFly
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« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2010, 01:35:02 PM »

I've got one in leather hobbles...even had to send them for stitching once done oiling them for days.

Another trainer sent us a maiden filly. In short, she wanted to kill anyone that came near her, and forget clipping or shoeing. Her mouth had open wounds from being jogged with a snake bit daily, she would run over you, rear up and flip over backwards when you went to unhook her, and throw herself down in the paddock stall.

That was 6 weeks ago. I started the ground work at kindergarten level...halting in hand, backing, standing with just voice, body language and a pole cord. Then went to free work in the arena and ground driving. Lots of praise, consistent correcting and lots of lateral work.

I clipped her Monday, with a lead line over her neck, no restraints, she dropped her head with thumb pressure to her pole and stood.

Time for shoes....pole cord for pressure in case of resistance, but not needed...all four hooves shod 40 minutes and no battle. One happy blacksmith, still sore from the first shoeing, but filled with glee over our "new" filly.

Yesterday I paddocked her alone with two bad actors on either side, kicking the walls and carrying on. She stood like a stone horse, giving me room, not slamming me into the walls, screaming and peeing all over. Warmed up open, no plugs, just a smooth mini in case. When she came off the track see pulled up and stood to be unhooked with one WHOA.

I like groundwork, I do believe dressage training benefits ALL horses...from your show hunter, reiner and trotter or pacer. I see the benefits in my horse's minds, manners and fitness...just never call me a DQ!!! Haha...rider joke.



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fairgame
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« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2010, 01:55:28 PM »

In the hands of a lead-handed person (and by your inability to understand what I said, it's obvious you're one of those)

lead head = lead hands?
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« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2010, 06:43:52 PM »

People who point fingers should remmember that when you point a finger you have three pointing back at you.
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« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2010, 03:43:08 AM »

People who point fingers should remmember that when you point a finger you have three pointing back at you.

  In reading Samstar's posts, sounds like he has light hands.  Able to take equipment off and go easy.  Also able to use a dog chain with good results.  (Dog chains, wow, now there's a piece of equipment that definitely does not belong in the wrong hands.) 
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paul
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« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2010, 08:24:20 AM »

OGM, by reading all your comments, it seem you think you know everything. You are always putting others down. Do you train stbs? would love to see you stats(because you must be at the top of the trainers list in your state)What great horses did you have? If I didn't know better I would think you are Casie Coleman. But Casie wouldn't say alot of the  stupid things you have. Also the comments you make about harness horseman is just plain ignorant.
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BabyFireFly
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« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2010, 12:03:43 PM »

Why not just PM her instead of posting something to derail the thread?
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tankin
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« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2010, 03:37:45 PM »

paul its just what she does.now she can tell by the way someone types whether they have soft hands or not.watch out casie coleman.
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« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2010, 03:52:08 PM »

  Maybe you should try a gag bit on yourself.    nyah
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