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Author Topic: calming a horse  (Read 5025 times)
OldGreyMare
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« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2010, 06:12:14 PM »

  Fixed it, I think.  Thought I marked it public, but maybe I didn't hit the "save changes" button.  It must default to private.

 
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« Reply #26 on: February 21, 2010, 08:06:54 AM »

Fixed it, I think.  Thought I marked it public, but maybe I didn't hit the "save changes" button.  It must default to private.
 

OGM, I watched all of your videos over the last couple of days with great interest.  Thank you for sharing them with members.  I certainly wished I lived closer to you as I would have sent you a squirrely little jader a couple years ago.  The horse has calmed significantly with age but your techniques and handling might have saved us some tense episodes.  Everyone survived and nobody was hurt. 

Good stuff from everyone on this thread!!   thumbs up  I'm going to ask Janine to move this to Conditioning/Training forum -- would hate to loose it ... hope everyone agrees.
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OldGreyMare
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« Reply #27 on: February 21, 2010, 09:45:23 AM »

  Another example:  yesterday I had just brought that big mare out into the arena, she was standing facing me with her back to the open, outside wall.  A slab of snow slid off the roof and spooked her.  She reared up, but kept her front legs tucked to her belly, then leaped to the side away from me, and bolted around me.  She didn't pull on the rope to get away, she just put me in between her and the scary object.  3 weeks ago she would have had no qualms about plowing over top of me. 
  That's just another of many, many times that Exercise 1: "Stay Out of My Space" has saved me from serious injury.
  It takes years of work and age before a horse could be completely bombproof, but if all we accomplish is that you don't jump on me when you do spook, that's enough.  I would think anybody that works with horses would see the value in that.
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« Reply #28 on: February 21, 2010, 02:47:14 PM »

  Another example:  yesterday I had just brought that big mare out into the arena, she was standing facing me with her back to the open, outside wall.  A slab of snow slid off the roof and spooked her.  She reared up, but kept her front legs tucked to her belly, then leaped to the side away from me, and bolted around me.  She didn't pull on the rope to get away, she just put me in between her and the scary object.  3 weeks ago she would have had no qualms about plowing over top of me. 
  That's just another of many, many times that Exercise 1: "Stay Out of My Space" has saved me from serious injury.
  It takes years of work and age before a horse could be completely bombproof, but if all we accomplish is that you don't jump on me when you do spook, that's enough.  I would think anybody that works with horses would see the value in that.

Again, I think the work you do is amazing and of utmost importance.  So often I see Trainers of Racehorses not have the time,  patience or facilities to work thru the basic things you mention.  The arena videos are very helpful.  I like the pop-ups you've added to some (helps viewer follow along) and could really hear your voice when working with John's colt.  He's a steady little sort isn't he, I love that young'in stature (he looks like he really trusts you too).  Good job. 

I can't watch that one anymore with sound -- the rooster makes my dogs go nuts!!  LOL.
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Exbourne
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« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2010, 06:36:36 PM »

An Empty Jug Outside the stall..The horse will play with it.Keep the horse busy and mabey will relax.
A long shot but has worked before with one of my TBS
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sparky
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« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2010, 06:41:46 PM »

As far as race time, ACTH-B1 about 4 hours out should do the trick.  Have done this with new horses that are kinda "crazy".  Should only have to do this a couple times as the horse will adapt to the pre-race set-up.  Just alittle something to take the edge off until they have enough trust in you.  Because basically thats usually all it is.
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Exbourne
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« Reply #31 on: February 22, 2010, 02:44:37 AM »

As far as race time, ACTH-B1 about 4 hours out should do the trick.  Have done this with new horses that are kinda "crazy".  Should only have to do this a couple times as the horse will adapt to the pre-race set-up.  Just alittle something to take the edge off until they have enough trust in you.  Because basically thats usually all it is.
Mints and time has worked also 4 me..Not being a dreamer..Try the jug 1st
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Tidy Sister
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« Reply #32 on: March 02, 2010, 05:57:18 AM »

The videos that OGM are posting should be required viewing for all horsepeople.

New to the game or otherwise.

Thank you OGM

TS
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Suicide_Mare
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« Reply #33 on: March 02, 2010, 06:28:35 AM »

Hey TS -- I'm sure OGM will see you're thanks.  I don't mean to pounce on your post but you made me catch up on this thread (since we're the only folks awake and posting)!  LOL.

I wanted to add a morning funny about play toys for an active horse to Exbourne's point on the plastic hanging jug.  They are cheap and go along way.  Those apple hanging things are good too.  A bungy cord on the stall gate can be a great distraction, and who knows your horse may learn to strum it a little (mine does).  You probably know about the construction cones, very useful.  Get the right size for your horse.  Basketballs, footballs, too.

This goofy horse I know will occupy himself given a variety of toys.  A while back we enter the Barn in the morning and two corn cobs were picked off the floor and placed him in his empty feed bucket, the cone was outside his gate standing upright in front of his stall like it was a construction zone ... and somehow the basketball was floating in the water bucket.  Now, if that's not a horse party, what is ?? 

Have a great day everyone !!
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Tannor
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« Reply #34 on: March 06, 2010, 01:51:06 AM »

What if the horse is just plain and simply nervous. I understand the groundwork stuff but i feel that that cures them of bein afraid of things. Maybe it is all connected but i've got one that doesnt spook at stuff hes just nervous no matter how much work you put on him or how little. No facilities at the track to turn him out or i would.

Tannor
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« Reply #35 on: March 06, 2010, 10:21:49 AM »

  Probably the kind of horse who, if he was out in the herd, would be near the bottom of the pecking order.  He needs a more dominant horse to follow, keep him safe from the wolves so to speak.  Being separated from the herd creates a lot of stress for a horse like this.  Doing the groundwork shows him that you are someone he can trust to be the leader.  Once he has that assurance, his anxieties will diminish.
  This is why turning out as suggested works, especially if you turn him out with others.  Safety in numbers.  I don't know if turning out alone would work.  He'ld probably run the fence and basically tire himself out rather than calm down.

   I have to give a lot of credit to my riding horses for helping me with these problem horses.  They are very mellow and calm, great for destressing the racehorses.  If I have a really bad horse, I'll do a lot of ponying off one of them... then when they score down, have the driver go right to the outrider.

  Chris Cox, my favorite NH guy, who works with wild mustangs and total outlaws destined for the killers, actually does groundwork while riding his stud horse, Pepto.   The horse responds totally to leg commands, leaving Chris's hands free.  Quite something to see.
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OldGreyMare
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« Reply #36 on: April 01, 2010, 06:27:47 AM »

  New horse.  Very nervous mare.  Runs in and out of doors, hard to bridle*.  Tries to commit suicide on the trailer.
  Working with her at the track because of the trailer issues.  Hopefully we can fix that, as turn-out with the herd and fresh green grass would be ideal.
   First day did basic groundwork.  Sweetheart to work with.  Advanced all the way to tossing the rope over and around her.  Stiff at the flex, but most Standardbreds are..   Got her dropping her head with the poll pressure cue.  She's really insecure and looking for someone to trust.
   I would imagine she's a tie-up horse so we'll see if these de-stressing exercises will improve her from the $5000 claimer she currently is.

  * Has that fungussy crap in her ears.  Any suggestions how to clear that up once I get to where I can touch them?
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fairgame
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« Reply #37 on: April 01, 2010, 06:46:17 AM »

      * Has that fungussy crap in her ears.  Any suggestions how to clear that up once I get to where I can touch them?


pink swat 

sticks better than the white, easy to apply too  because it sticks to your thumb too until you can swipe it in there
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