Chicago Barn to Wire
Home | News | Bloggers | Forums | Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Contact Us | Search


December 22, 2014, 04:08:42 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you don't remember your password, email me.

New  registration procedures -- Some ISPs have been bouncing the verification emails.  Please email me to be activated or if you have any problems.  Click Contact Us above.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Science or Superstition?  (Read 2065 times)
Claiming King
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1693




Ignore
« on: January 16, 2010, 09:11:04 AM »

I sat behind my first horse about sixty years ago. I was taught a lot of valuable stuff by my grandfather, my father, and my uncles as well as some other great horsemen. But along the way I began to question some of the things I learned. There's so much science in the game today. But I'm sure even some of you young guys have been handed down methods via tradition that maybe you take for granted without questioning.

For example, cutting a stallion on a waning moon. What scientific reason is there for that? None that I can think of, but I wouldn't have considered gelding one on a waxing moon. I probably still wouldn't. Better safe than sorry and that was the way I was taught.

How about feeding corn? It's a "hot" feed. What the hell does that mean? I understand it's richer than the grass that horses were designed to digest through evolution. That's science. But not feeding it in summer? I don't know the basis for that. A horse is a non-ruminant herbivore. It's probably better if he never got corn at all.

Anyway, the more I think about it, I kind of ran a stable based on a whole lot of superstitions and wive's tales. How about you guys?
Report to moderator   Logged
ggenie
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 309




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2010, 11:21:48 AM »

I'm the same way, I always cut by the moon.
Report to moderator   Logged
samstar
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1248

Harness racing is fun




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2010, 06:22:53 AM »

Lots of people still cut by the moon. Obviously corn weighs more per bushell and has more energy per bushel.  You can over feed anything and  corn is no exception.  I love o throw my charges a couple of ears of corn.  They enjoy eating corn on the cob as  much as I do.
Report to moderator   Logged

Happiness is consiously chosen and hard-won!
Old and Slow
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2811




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2010, 09:16:57 AM »

How about weaning on a full moon? Or worming on a full moon?

Corn is quick energy, for sure, like a sugar buzz after a donut. We don't feed a lot of corn in our mix, but rather increase the fat level (to at least 7- 10%).  Fat has 2.25 times more energy than carbs or protein, so I think they finish the mile stronger.

We discussed the "hot fuel" saying and my wife remembers reading that it comes from the belief in the old days that you feed corn in the winter to keep a horse warm, so you don't feed it in the summer so a horse stays cooler.

The digestive process generates heat, no doubt, but corn doesn't have the fiber content that hay does, so I think they stay plenty warm with free choice hay.

We do like to throw them a few whole ears in the fall, and as samstar says, they like it as much as I do! 
Report to moderator   Logged

I know one thing for sure.  Indecision may or may not be my problem.
Suicide_Mare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1124




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2010, 09:33:29 AM »

The scientific aspects of full moon have to do with gravitational forces.  The cycle of the moon, the earth etc. gives us our seasons, daylight, ebb/tides, menstrual cycles, fertility, all that stuff.    The folklore has some scientific basis to increased bleeding and/or the slowness of clotting under a full moon.  Modern technology has overcome this but when it comes to gelding -- how much technology is really used? 

Never heard about the weaning or worming.  Interesting.
Report to moderator   Logged
Old and Slow
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2811




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2010, 11:01:35 AM »

Apparently the worming has some basis in fact - due to the same gravitational forces. The gravity actually helps "pull" more worms out.
Or so they say.
Report to moderator   Logged

I know one thing for sure.  Indecision may or may not be my problem.
Suicide_Mare
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1124




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2010, 03:01:40 AM »

Apparently the worming has some basis in fact - due to the same gravitational forces. The gravity actually helps "pull" more worms out.
Or so they say.

That makes sense.  Gross but understandable.  Some of the subjects we talk about on here are about getting back to the nature of things!

The superstitions that crack me up are the barn and racing items.  I thought them silly at first and quickly fell into line.  No peanuts on race day, no cutting of forelocks (or any hair), no humans peeing in stalls (which I avoid at all costs), to braid or not to braid, etc. 
Report to moderator   Logged
Mel from Moline
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3345




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2010, 08:16:01 AM »

The feeding of corn does raise their body temps a bit...but I'm sure thats based solely on whats in the corn...(starch,etc) as far as the geldings, I've seen it both ways...thats bunk. Great topic...wives tales are fun to really try to rationalize because they come from a lack of true education....much like a tornado wont dip into a valley or cross a river....ummm.. try telling that to the tornado, its going wherever it wants....
Report to moderator   Logged

Horses make the humans...not the other way around.
tankin
Full Member
***
Posts: 246




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2010, 06:25:57 PM »

actually feeding to much corn can cause pregnant mares to abort.its to hot.
Report to moderator   Logged
dempster
Newbie
*
Posts: 30




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2010, 02:17:59 AM »

actually feeding to much corn can cause pregnant mares to abort.its to hot.

Some grains can cause abortions in mares due to ergot fungus infestation. Usually it's
barley, wheat and rye. Corn can also have a form of this fungus. Oats is only  susceptible to these fungi rarely so it is a safer grain for pregnant mares.
Report to moderator   Logged
Flirty Flo
Flirtologist
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 54

I'd introduce myself but you already know who I am


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2010, 07:33:32 AM »

I have found that with feeding corn, my horses carry a higher temperature...hense the hot factor...I was finding that they were blowing more after training and racing and temps staying elevated longer too after exersise. I changed from corn to a high fat supplement called rice bran (20%-30% fat)...I have found my temps say more regulated and my horses finish their miles with much more vigor. I'ts great to feed also if you are trying to put weight on one good for their coat and skin too!!!

I always wondered about the a tradition of throwing the testicles on the roof of the barn for good luck after gelding them...They would say "we gotta feed em to the crows"...Huh
Report to moderator   Logged

melodyjordanracingstable.com "In it to win it"
Claiming King
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1693




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2010, 07:40:42 AM »

Well, I don't think corn is any "hotter" than any other feed. Traditionally guys fed quarts. But as Samstar pointed out there's more to a quart of corn than there is to a quart of oats. Just like a quart of ice cream isn't the same as a quart of spinach. If anything, the additional fiber in oats as opposed to corn might actually result in a slight increase in body temp.

I think we can all agree that a horse in nature would never be eating corn. Just like a cow wouldn't. These animals are herbivores. They're not really set up to digest rich grains. A cow with its four chambered system and rumen has particular difficulty processing that grain. Although a horse is not a ruminant and its digestive system is different than that of a cow, it is still an herbivore that evolved on grasslands.
Report to moderator   Logged
casandra1
Newbie
*
Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2010, 07:12:54 AM »

When you trow the balls on the roof, when they are dried up your horse is healed.
Report to moderator   Logged
samstar
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1248

Harness racing is fun




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2010, 08:19:00 AM »

When you trow the balls on the roof, when they are dried up your horse is healed.

Would that work if you hung them on the bumper of your truck?
Report to moderator   Logged

Happiness is consiously chosen and hard-won!
Old and Slow
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2811




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2010, 07:51:27 AM »

Would that work if you hung them on the bumper of your truck?
laughing guy
Report to moderator   Logged

I know one thing for sure.  Indecision may or may not be my problem.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.082 seconds with 17 queries.

Home
Upcoming events
Breeders' Cup
Horse slaughter in IL
Racing TV schedule
News Updates
Legislation

Galloping Out

Previous stories

Arlington
Balmoral
Hawthorne
Maywood
Chicago Sun-Times
Chicago Tribune
Blood-Horse
Daily Racing Form
Thoroughbred Times
Harness Link
Illinois Racing Board

 

2014

Breeders' Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2013

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2012

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

More ebay items

 

Home | News Updates | Bloggers | Forums | Search
Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Advertising | Contact Us

Copyright © 2000-2014 Chicago Barn to Wire. All rights reserved.
Privacy policy