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Author Topic: Training- recovering from a long ship  (Read 6255 times)
samstar
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« on: November 05, 2009, 08:39:46 PM »

I just accepted delivery of a horse from FLA.  32 hour ship. Arrived Tuesday night.  He hasn't eaten a full meal since he arrived and I was told that he is a great eater.  No fever.  Anybody have a similar experience?
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Suicide_Mare
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« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2009, 10:26:49 PM »

I only have simple suggestions.  Shipped our own half that distance/time and they were fine upon arrival but we were on the receiving end.  Incoming new horses from a different stable (no matter close or far) seem slow to eat especially if they are on the young side or have only been in one home their whole life.  We concentrate on over-welcoming them into the heard with reassurance and fussing (I know it sounds fu-fuu) ... two days tops they're eating fine.  Got a couple suggestions on additives but only if necessary.

Ohh, is he drinking good?  You said he looked super but a long ship can be very dehydrating and stressful.  Thus, no eating.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2009, 10:34:04 PM by Suicide_Mare » Report to moderator   Logged
Old and Slow
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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2009, 07:17:12 AM »

Everything is new to him - you, his stall, his barnmates, the hay, the water and probably the grain. Can be overwhelming for a few days.

As Mare mentioned, drinking is the most important thing. A long ship is dehydrating. If you have automatic waterers, turn it off and hang a bucket so you can monitor how much he's drinking. I'd also give him a good electrolyte paste like Finish Line's Electrocharge.

I would guess the hay in Florida is different from yours. Did the shipper send a few bales of hay along? If he did, mix some of yours in. If he didn't try hay cubes - they'll munch on them out of boredom if nothing else.

Is he getting the same brand of grain? A sudden change can throw them off. If you can find out what he was getting, see if you can get it locally by you, and then gradually mix in your brand.

I'd also give him a pro-biotic to get his gut moving again.  We like Probios, available at BigD's and most tack shops.

There's also a supplement called Ration Plus. It's a pro-biotic that aids their appetite, too.

Finally, (sorry to be so long winded) I'd give him some papaya juice, it's a great stomach soother. Just put few pieces in the blender with some water until it's the consitancy where you can put it in a dose syringe and shoot it in his mouth. 2 ounces twice a day for a few days or longer if you think he may have ulcers. I'd shy away from the ulcer meds with aluminum - very hard on the horses system.

Hope this helps.
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Suicide_Mare
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2009, 12:27:33 PM »

Great input.  thumbs up Special feeding is a pain-in-the butt ... but ya gotta do whatever to get 'em to eat.  I tend to be reminded of my parents telling me to eat what was served or go hungry (LOL).  On the dehydration, I've used an EquiTea mixture in water to add Electrolytes with great success (especially summer time).  Available from BigDees.

Thanks for the tip on the papaya for ulcers.  I got one that I'll try that on.   beer
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Mel from Moline
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2009, 12:35:22 PM »

I just accepted delivery of a horse from FLA.  32 hour ship. Arrived Tuesday night.  He hasn't eaten a full meal since he arrived and I was told that he is a great eater.  No fever.  Anybody have a similar experience?



Did you check for a temp? Usually happens on those long ships....good luck. Hard thing to stand there with the trailer dancing under them all that time.
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samstar
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« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2009, 06:03:38 PM »

Thanks guys, I hung a bucket and he was not drinking as much as I would like.  Took his temp and it was 98.8.  Gave hiim a big jug and he ate all of his supper. I think he is going to be fine.
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« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2009, 06:51:25 AM »

Great input.  thumbs up Special feeding is a pain-in-the butt ... but ya gotta do whatever to get 'em to eat.  I tend to be reminded of my parents telling me to eat what was served or go hungry (LOL).  On the dehydration, I've used an EquiTea mixture in water to add Electrolytes with great success (especially summer time).  Available from BigDees.

Thanks for the tip on the papaya for ulcers.  I got one that I'll try that on.   beer

Big fan of the papaye juice. We have a 7 year old gelding, fought ulcers for 3 years, tried Gastro Gard, Gastro Aid, gastro this and that. Found out about papaya and and he put on weight and is racing better than he ever has.

Good for people, too. I like it with some dark rum Grin
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Suicide_Mare
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« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2009, 07:05:41 AM »

Big fan of the papaye juice. We have a 7 year old gelding, fought ulcers for 3 years, tried Gastro Gard, Gastro Aid, gastro this and that. Found out about papaya and and he put on weight and is racing better than he ever has.

Good for people, too. I like it with some dark rum Grin

We only suspect a condition because of occasional colic (like once every six-eight months) so we don't want to overreact but a home-grown remedy with no side affects is just up my alley.  The horse is young, racing consistently and very healthy.  Don't want to mess with the things that are going right!  Good eater too, good weight.  I'll try the papaya with Rum if you say so (after noon today).  Tx. again.
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samstar
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« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2009, 08:53:54 AM »

We only suspect a condition because of occasional colic (like once every six-eight months) so we don't want to overreact but a home-grown remedy with no side affects is just up my alley.  The horse is young, racing consistently and very healthy.  Don't want to mess with the things that are going right!  Good eater too, good weight.  I'll try the papaya with Rum if you say so (after noon today).  Tx. again.
how much rum? LOL
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« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2009, 08:59:50 AM »

I am lovin these posts...Not a horseman but a bettor and fan of these fine equine specimen.  Really helps me understand all of the work, and I knew there was a ton, that goes into the care of these beautiful animals.. thumbs up beer thumbs up beer
Keep them comming...
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« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2009, 09:34:53 AM »

how much rum? LOL
2 ozs rum to 4 ounces papaya.  Sometimes my wife puts it in a dose syringe and shoots it down my throat - other days she just shows me the whip and I drink down Grin
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« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2009, 10:16:32 AM »

See NOC, its all about finding the right concoctions for the horses, owners and trainers!

2 ozs rum to 4 ounces papaya.  Sometimes my wife puts it in a dose syringe and shoots it down my throat - other days she just shows me the whip and I drink down Grin

                   

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samstar
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« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2009, 04:33:38 PM »

Trained my new horse on the fairground track today.  Just one trip in 12 lst half in 4.  He is awesome. Big gaited and slick but he still isn't eating like I would want.
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« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2009, 05:31:19 PM »

Trained my new horse on the fairground track today.  Just one trip in 12 lst half in 4.  He is awesome. Big gaited and slick but he still isn't eating like I would want.
Let us know if that mile perks up his appetite.

Is he getting the same grain he got in Florida?
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samstar
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« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2009, 09:24:00 AM »

Talked to the previous trainer today.  He  said that he started tailing off of his feed the week before he was sold.  I am going to try the feed that he used last but I am not sure that will do much good.  These problems are like crossword puzzles, you just have to work them out and not give up and get help anywhere you can.
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samstar
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« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2009, 09:04:52 PM »

Vet over ruled me.  Suggested possibl ulcers. Started on ulcer medicine tonight.
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Suicide_Mare
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« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2009, 05:11:23 AM »

Maybe it is time for the papaya juice!  Hey, Samstar you never mentioned if his SGOT was within normal range (I think Tsunami mentioned this on the other thread).  Sometimes the stress of a stable move can be highly internalized.  I also wanted to ask you if he is wearing a fall jacket.  The temperature change may be affecting him too (again, back to the fu-fuu).  I know it is like a crossword puzzle ... keep trying.  I've nicknamed this horse Sammy's Shipper, Tx for the updates.
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vegas jay
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« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2009, 05:21:41 AM »

Just wanted to say how much I'm enjoying your comments about the care of horses. It's a side of racing that non-horsemen like me are seldom privileged to see. I'm learning a lot from all of your insights and find it fascinating as well as enlightening. You're adding a lot to my knowledge and enjoyment of the sport. Thanks, guys and gals.
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Suicide_Mare
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« Reply #18 on: November 10, 2009, 05:46:08 AM »

Samstar started these threads and is doing a great job keeping 'em up thumbs up; even with the new addition to his/her stable.  Gave us like a project to help with!
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« Reply #19 on: November 10, 2009, 06:56:18 AM »

Samstar, Suicide Mare is right, time for the papaya juice:
http://www.stomachsoother.com/article1.asp
With so much emphasis placed on competition and performance, many horses are developing gastrointestinal problems. Anything that causes stress such as hauling, competing, stall rest, or breeding can lead to problems with the GI tract, including sour stomach and ulcers. Several symptoms of gastrointestinal ailments include going off feed, colic, weight loss, poor coat quality, sour attitude, lethargy, or abnormal behavior. It is important to consult your veterinarian regarding these symptoms to ensure they are not life threatening. Many horse owners who have observed these symptoms in the past have relied on alternative supplements to help keep their horses’ gastrointestinal tracts healthy. Now there is something new to try.

Natural Plan Stomach Soother™ is an all-natural treatment for stomach ulcers and digestive problems. It is made entirely from the papaya fruit, which has been used for years to calm babies with colic. The most useful part of the papaya is Papain. A main ingredient in many indigestion medications and similar to the digestive enzyme pepsin, Papain stimulates appetite, soothes the esophagus and stomach membranes and relieves inflammatory bowel disorders. Papaya also contains vitamins A and C, calcium, niacin, potassium, riboflavin and thiamin, all beneficial to horse health.
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samstar
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« Reply #20 on: November 10, 2009, 08:35:47 AM »

My wife and I both tried the papaya Juice.  4 ounces  juice, 2 ounces rum?  It didn't seem to help the horse but it made us feel better.
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« Reply #21 on: November 10, 2009, 09:07:37 AM »

Talked to the previous trainer today.  He  said that he started tailing off of his feed the week before he was sold.  I am going to try the feed that he used last but I am not sure that will do much good.  These problems are like crossword puzzles, you just have to work them out and not give up and get help anywhere you can.


If you think you can learn how to train a horse is by reading "friendly posts" on the internet - you are the type of person people want to race against.
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samstar
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« Reply #22 on: November 10, 2009, 10:04:00 AM »


If you think you can learn how to train a horse is by reading "friendly posts" on the internet - you are the type of person people want to race against.

I keep six honest serving-men
(They taught me all I knew);
Their names are What and Why and
When
And How and Where and Who
I send them over land and sea
I send them east and west;
But after they have worked for me,
I give them all a rest.

Rudyard Kippling


"Questions are the answer". Samstar
« Last Edit: November 10, 2009, 10:13:14 AM by samstar » Report to moderator   Logged

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samstar
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« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2009, 10:18:31 AM »


If you think you can learn how to train a horse is by reading "friendly posts" on the internet - you are the type of person people want to race against.

Respectfully
If you think you know it all and can't learn by asking questions and aren't smart enough to sift through the answers to those questions, you are the type of person that I want to race against.
Respectfully


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Old and Slow
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« Reply #24 on: November 10, 2009, 10:24:50 AM »


If you think you can learn how to train a horse is by reading "friendly posts" on the internet - you are the type of person people want to race against.
Do you train?

Why do you feel compelled to trivialize an honest discussion?
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