Chicago Barn to Wire Breeders' Cup Handicapping Tournaments
Home | News | Bloggers | Forums | Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Contact Us | Search


November 01, 2014, 04:03:49 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you don't remember your password, email me.

New  registration procedures -- Some ISPs have been bouncing the verification emails.  Please email me to be activated or if you have any problems.  Click Contact Us above.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Aminorex Mystery Solved?  (Read 3261 times)
njhorseman
Guest

« on: March 17, 2007, 08:36:37 PM »

Press release from Freedom Health LLC.

PLEASE NOTE THAT I HAVE PUT A QUESTION MARK IN THE SUBJECT LINE, AS THIS STUDY WAS COMMISSIONED BY A COMPANY THAT MANUFACTURES A SUPPLEMENT WHICH, ACCORDING TO SOME SOURCES, HAS BEEN LINKED TO THE POSITIVES.

THE STUDY MAY BE 100% CORRECT, BUT TO REALLY BE ACCEPTED AS THE ANSWER TO THE AMINOREX MYSTERY, IT NEEDS TO BE INDEPENDENTLY DUPLICATED.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aminorex Racehorse Mystery Clarified

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:

Scott Carter, PhD

330-562-0888 ext. 107

scarter@freedomhealthllc.com

Aurora, OH (March 17, 2007) - Over the past 2 + years, racehorses
(principally Standardbreds) have tested positive for the amphetamine,
Aminorex. This drug is a Class 1 substance, where positives result in
a 1-5 year suspension from racing. Progressively, rumors have
circulated that certain products may incorporate an ingredient that is
not on the label, including Freedom Health's product: SUCCEED®
Digestive Conditioning Program® ["SUCCEED"]

Freedom Health employed a federally accredited analytical toxicology
laboratory to conduct independent, random sampling of SUCCEED and
analyze these samples using LC/MS/MS analytical procedures for the
presence of Aminorex. These LC/MS/MS procedures are the standard
procedures used by the federal government and racing commissions for
the detection of Aminorex in biological samples.

The LC/MS/MS analysis of random samples of SUCCEED, both oral paste
and granular forms, were NEGATIVE for the presence of Aminorex.

In an effort to further elucidate the reasons behind the rash of
Aminorex positives in the horse racing community, Freedom Health has
learned the following:

1. Using the same LC/MS/MS standard procedures for the detection of
Aminorex, when a commonly used over the counter anthelmetic,
injectable levamisole phosphate, is assayed directly from the original
container, the laboratory reported that it contains a substance that
has a similar molecular weight to Aminorex. However, it has a
different extraction time, which indicates that it is NOT Aminorex.
Other commercially available products, including the non-injectable
forms of levamisole, were NOT found to contain this same compound
using the same analytical LC/MS/MS procedures.
2. When horses were administered a variety of commercially available
wormers and urinalysis was conducted by the laboratory using LC/MS/MS
procedures for the detection of Aminorex, it reported that the
aforesaid compound was only detected in the urine of horses
administered injectable levamisole phosphate. Additionally, laboratory
results showed two other compounds were detected only in the urine of
horses administered injectable levamisole phosphate. These two
additional compounds have the same molecular weight as Aminorex, but
only one of these compounds had an identical extraction time to
Aminorex, indicating a potential positive result for detection of
Aminorex.
3. Using GC/MS analytical techniques to further elucidate the exact
chemical structure of this potential Aminorex compound, laboratory
analysis found that this compound was Aminorex.
4. Laboratory results indicate that the levels of Aminorex in urine
from horses administered injectable levamisole phosphate parallel
those reported in past and current positive results as handed down by
racing authorities.

To summarize, the laboratory results indicate that in our study ONLY
the horses receiving the injectable levamisole phosphate product,
either orally or intramuscularly, resulted in an Aminorex positive
result. Aminorex was NOT found in the product itself, only in the
urine of treated horses after administration of this product, and
never in the urine of horses receiving other anthelmetic products.

John Hall, President and CEO of Freedom Health LLC said "It was vital
that we not only exonerate SUCCEED, but also that we determine the
true cause of these positives to dispel any residual innuendoes. Dr.
Franklin L. Pellegrini, Vice-President of Veterinary Affairs, has
combined his investigatory analyses of the past two years with the
independent analysis of one of the most highly regarded analytical
toxicology teams in the country to finally resolve this conundrum:
Petra G. Hartmann, Director, Drug Testing Services, and her colleagues
at The Industrial Laboratories Company Inc. On February 1, 2007, we
invited Ohio State Racing Commission to monitor this independent
analysis before we commenced. After due consideration at the highest
levels, they declined on February 5."

Dr. Frank Pellegrini said "Friends, colleagues and erstwhile clients
have sought my help when caught in the Aminorex test "trap". It has
made absolutely no sense that reputable trainers would deliberately
use a Class 1 substance, where the recommended penalty effectively
results in a loss of livelihood; much less continue to do so when a
valid test exists for this drug. For two years, I have attempted to
identify a common thread. My investigations became more urgent as
progressive rumors circulated that SUCCEED could be the culprit.
Finally, in January, I believed I had identified this common factor.
It then became imperative that any testing be independent, by the most
capable team in the United States. I therefore approached Petra
Hartmann with my concerns, and asked that she test SUCCEED, and my
suspect materials. I chose The Industrial Laboratories Inc., because
Ms. Hartmann is the vice-chair of the Association of Racing
Commissioners International Testing Integrity Program. We received the
final report today. I am delighted that we can be a part of resolving
this matter for the overall benefit of horse racing in both the USA
and Canada."
Report to moderator   Logged
the DailyDaley
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1392




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2007, 11:02:25 AM »

Imagine that, the "STORE" bought version doesn't test. But why would one think differently?.

A good test report, but possibly self serving. If this was the BIG NEWS Dr. P, then the ORC is way ahead of you.

And PS various parties have discussed the "OTHER POSSIBILITIES" concerning other non-labeled, non-prescribed altered "street" products.

As Ken Chadwick so aptly put a few months ago, can "white people" slip on black ice geezer.

That will be the million dollar dollar question. Very disappointed Dr P. No extremely disappointed in "THE NEWS".

This is like saying the Boston Strangler didn't use a gun.

clocker clocker clocker MARCHES on.

Who is playing their own music. Dr Hook and the MEDICINE SHOW dude.
Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2007, 01:43:34 PM »

Standardbred Canada(the Canadian equivalent of USTA) has now posted this on the news page of their website.
Apparently being taken seriously.
Report to moderator   Logged
AlongTheRail
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 436




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2007, 06:24:19 PM »

The sheep wormer that these trainers had given was Tramisol, also known as Levamisole.  And based upon this report, the Levamisole Phosphate is causing the Aminorex positives.  There is no Aminorex in the wormers, but when administered to horses, the urine byproduct is Aminorex.  So that means anyone that owns a horse has there own little meth lab right in front of them.  If this is true, you'll make more money then racing by continually dosing your horse with sheep wormer, collecting the urine, dehydrating it, bagging the powder, and selling it on the street.  Anyone know what the going street value of Aminorex is?  dollar dollar dollar
Report to moderator   Logged
the DailyDaley
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1392




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2007, 07:20:26 PM »

Press release from Freedom Health LLC.

PLEASE NOTE THAT I HAVE PUT A QUESTION MARK IN THE SUBJECT LINE, AS THIS STUDY WAS COMMISSIONED BY A COMPANY THAT MANUFACTURES A SUPPLEMENT WHICH, ACCORDING TO SOME SOURCES, HAS BEEN LINKED TO THE POSITIVES.

THE STUDY MAY BE 100% CORRECT, BUT TO REALLY BE ACCEPTED AS THE ANSWER TO THE AMINOREX MYSTERY, IT NEEDS TO BE INDEPENDENTLY DUPLICATED.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aminorex Racehorse Mystery Clarified

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:

Scott Carter, PhD

330-562-0888 ext. 107

scarter@freedomhealthllc.com

Aurora, OH (March 17, 2007) - Over the past 2 + years, racehorses
(principally Standardbreds) have tested positive for the amphetamine,
Aminorex. This drug is a Class 1 substance, where positives result in
a 1-5 year suspension from racing. Progressively, rumors have
circulated that certain products may incorporate an ingredient that is
not on the label, including Freedom Health's product: SUCCEED®
Digestive Conditioning Program® ["SUCCEED"]

Freedom Health employed a federally accredited analytical toxicology
laboratory to conduct independent, random sampling of SUCCEED and
analyze these samples using LC/MS/MS analytical procedures for the
presence of Aminorex. These LC/MS/MS procedures are the standard
procedures used by the federal government and racing commissions for
the detection of Aminorex in biological samples.

The LC/MS/MS analysis of random samples of SUCCEED, both oral paste
and granular forms, were NEGATIVE for the presence of Aminorex.

In an effort to further elucidate the reasons behind the rash of
Aminorex positives in the horse racing community, Freedom Health has
learned the following:

1. Using the same LC/MS/MS standard procedures for the detection of
Aminorex, when a commonly used over the counter anthelmetic,
injectable levamisole phosphate, is assayed directly from the original
container, the laboratory reported that it contains a substance that
has a similar molecular weight to Aminorex. However, it has a
different extraction time, which indicates that it is NOT Aminorex.
Other commercially available products, including the non-injectable
forms of levamisole, were NOT found to contain this same compound
using the same analytical LC/MS/MS procedures.
2. When horses were administered a variety of commercially available
wormers and urinalysis was conducted by the laboratory using LC/MS/MS
procedures for the detection of Aminorex, it reported that the
aforesaid compound was only detected in the urine of horses
administered injectable levamisole phosphate. Additionally, laboratory
results showed two other compounds were detected only in the urine of
horses administered injectable levamisole phosphate. These two
additional compounds have the same molecular weight as Aminorex, but
only one of these compounds had an identical extraction time to
Aminorex, indicating a potential positive result for detection of
Aminorex.
3. Using GC/MS analytical techniques to further elucidate the exact
chemical structure of this potential Aminorex compound, laboratory
analysis found that this compound was Aminorex.
4. Laboratory results indicate that the levels of Aminorex in urine
from horses administered injectable levamisole phosphate parallel
those reported in past and current positive results as handed down by
racing authorities.

To summarize, the laboratory results indicate that in our study ONLY
the horses receiving the injectable levamisole phosphate product,
either orally or intramuscularly, resulted in an Aminorex positive
result. Aminorex was NOT found in the product itself, only in the
urine of treated horses after administration of this product, and
never in the urine of horses receiving other anthelmetic products.

John Hall, President and CEO of Freedom Health LLC said "It was vital
that we not only exonerate SUCCEED, but also that we determine the
true cause of these positives to dispel any residual innuendoes. Dr.
Franklin L. Pellegrini, Vice-President of Veterinary Affairs, has
combined his investigatory analyses of the past two years with the
independent analysis of one of the most highly regarded analytical
toxicology teams in the country to finally resolve this conundrum:
Petra G. Hartmann, Director, Drug Testing Services, and her colleagues
at The Industrial Laboratories Company Inc. On February 1, 2007, we
invited Ohio State Racing Commission to monitor this independent
analysis before we commenced. After due consideration at the highest
levels, they declined on February 5."

Dr. Frank Pellegrini said "Friends, colleagues and erstwhile clients
have sought my help when caught in the Aminorex test "trap". It has
made absolutely no sense that reputable trainers would deliberately
use a Class 1 substance, where the recommended penalty effectively
results in a loss of livelihood;
much less continue to do so when a
valid test exists for this drug. For two years, I have attempted to
identify a common thread. My investigations became more urgent as
progressive rumors circulated that SUCCEED could be the culprit.
Finally, in January, I believed I had identified this common factor.
It then became imperative that any testing be independent, by the most
capable team in the United States. I therefore approached Petra
Hartmann with my concerns, and asked that she test SUCCEED, and my
suspect materials. I chose The Industrial Laboratories Inc., because
Ms. Hartmann is the vice-chair of the Association of Racing
Commissioners International Testing Integrity Program. We received the
final report today. I am delighted that we can be a part of resolving
this matter for the overall benefit of horse racing in both the USA
and Canada."

Dr. P so eloquently stated, why would REPUTABLE trainers would use a product as so on.

I guess this implicates the non-reputable trainers geezer.

Your OWN WORDS Dr p.
Report to moderator   Logged
bettor2belucky
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1782




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2007, 08:49:55 PM »

I read it differently as the by product was not Aminorex but a molecular similar weight and the same extraction (breakdown) time as Aminorex. If this is independently verified new testing criteria will be needed to identify this drug, IMO
Report to moderator   Logged

"A government big enough to give you everything you want,is a government big enough to take away everything you have."  Thomas Jefferson

"I'm the President I can afford better." Barack Hussein Obama
njhorseman
Guest

« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2007, 08:59:37 PM »

I read it differently as the by product was not Aminorex but a molecular similar weight and the same extraction (breakdown) time as Aminorex. If this is independently verified new testing criteria will be needed to identify this drug, IMO

Your interpretation is incorrect; Please see the following quotes. Both clearly say Aminorex was found in the urine of the treated horses.

"3. Using GC/MS analytical techniques to further elucidate the exact
chemical structure of this potential Aminorex compound, laboratory
analysis found that this compound was Aminorex."

" Aminorex was NOT found in the product itself, only in the
urine of treated horses after administration of this product, and
never in the urine of horses receiving other anthelmetic products."


Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2007, 09:43:59 PM »

Dr. P so eloquently stated, why would REPUTABLE trainers would use a product as so on.

I guess this implicates the non-reputable trainers geezer.

Your OWN WORDS Dr p.
Is this a deliberate distortion?Or are you just a moron?
Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2007, 09:58:42 PM »

The sheep wormer that these trainers had given was Tramisol, also known as Levamisole.  And based upon this report, the Levamisole Phosphate is causing the Aminorex positives.  There is no Aminorex in the wormers, but when administered to horses, the urine byproduct is Aminorex.  So that means anyone that owns a horse has there own little meth lab right in front of them.  If this is true, you'll make more money then racing by continually dosing your horse with sheep wormer, collecting the urine, dehydrating it, bagging the powder, and selling it on the street.  Anyone know what the going street value of Aminorex is?  dollar dollar dollar
I assume you're joking but will answer the questions:
There is almost no street demand for aminorex.It is easy and cheap to produce for anyone inclined to make home brew drugs.
The amount in the urine of horses is extremely small and probably would be worth way less than the cost of the wormer.Moreover,there is no practical way to purify it from urine.
Report to moderator   Logged
njhorseman
Guest

« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2007, 08:55:58 AM »

Is this a deliberate distortion?Or are you just a moron?

That gets the "Rhetorical Question of the Week" award.  Grin
Report to moderator   Logged
tonymfan
Guest

« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2007, 10:34:25 AM »

If the levamisole phosphate answer is right why do the positives show up only in certain areas all together? Don't horsemen in other states use the same wormer?
Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2007, 11:45:45 AM »

The test for aminorex is new.
As far as anybody knows horsemen have rarely or never used it.
It is not reasonably possible to test every sample for every known chemical.
It does not appear that the the active ingredient in the wormer leads to aminorex,since only one version of the wormer produced it.No manufactured product is absolutely chemically identical from one batch to another.
Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2007, 11:49:02 AM »

Another aminorex "positive" reported in Ontario today~~#12.
Report to moderator   Logged
talking head
Guest

« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2007, 03:26:27 PM »

If the levamisole phosphate answer is right why do the positives show up only in certain areas all together? Don't horsemen in other states use the same wormer?
Yes sheep wormer is used to stimulate a horses immune system. It has been used in that manner for years. It is also used to coverup some illegal drugs though you need to know how much to use!
Report to moderator   Logged
bettor2belucky
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1782




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2007, 03:29:54 PM »

So would it be correct to say that Aminorex is a byproduct of this particular wormer that is only produced in the urine?...........because if it is, how would they know if it was initially injected or not?   it shows only in the urine as a byproduct but when injected does it show in blood and urine?
« Last Edit: March 19, 2007, 03:33:13 PM by bettor2belucky » Report to moderator   Logged

"A government big enough to give you everything you want,is a government big enough to take away everything you have."  Thomas Jefferson

"I'm the President I can afford better." Barack Hussein Obama
DLeestable
Guest

« Reply #15 on: March 19, 2007, 03:50:42 PM »

Tramisol has been around for years.  It is the berries for clearing mucus from sick horses.  Any Farm and Fleet carries the stuff. It is not all injectable, they have it in pill form.  It works and its cheap, number one and two reasons horsemen use it.
Report to moderator   Logged
Doug Frosch
Newbie
*
Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: March 20, 2007, 07:09:40 AM »

Good Morning Double D,

I am feeling a bit "nefarious" today. Lets wait and see what happens.

Ciao!
« Last Edit: March 20, 2007, 08:16:29 AM by Doug Frosch » Report to moderator   Logged
tonymfan
Guest

« Reply #17 on: March 20, 2007, 10:23:15 AM »

Referencing Waterman statement of nefarious?

http://www.theharnessedge.com/news.asp?Mode=View&Story=19631

NJ horseman is right the study results that started this thread must be duplicated. Something that still doesn't make sense is Ontario says they started testing for the old drug Aminorex because they heard rumors it was being used. Do horsemen start rumors about substances that appear only as inadvertent byproducts in urine?
Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2007, 12:17:30 PM »

Stories of tips and rumors(rumours in Canada) are ALWAYS cited as justification for witch hunts.

Report to moderator   Logged
the DailyDaley
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1392




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: March 20, 2007, 12:19:28 PM »

Good Morning Double D,

I am feeling a bit "nefarious" today. Lets wait and see what happens.

Ciao!

It looks like you might be feeling a little "TRUCULENT" also.

tres bien!
Report to moderator   Logged
AmyHollar
FREE THE TROLLS!
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1162

I didn't fail gym. I just didn't try to damn hard




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 20, 2007, 12:21:01 PM »

Canada started testing after positives showed up in the states.  Just like I am sure the states are now testing for Toresimide (sp?) after the positives showed up north of the border.

Report to moderator   Logged

Do you want cream with that cup of shut the hell up?
AmyHollar
FREE THE TROLLS!
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1162

I didn't fail gym. I just didn't try to damn hard




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 20, 2007, 12:22:53 PM »

HEY NOW!  If I'm going to start needing a dictionary around here I might as well join the illiterate at horsepoopy! maroon










NOT! BSmeter
Report to moderator   Logged

Do you want cream with that cup of shut the hell up?
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2007, 12:29:32 PM »

Re: Dr. Waterman's statement:

He seems to be quite concerned about the guilty(if there are any)escaping punishment but is completely unconcernerd about punishing the innocent.

If there are both accidental and nefarious aminorex positives,in all probability,the nefarious ones would have a much larger concentration.But the authorities don't want to consider this because it admits the fallacy of what they've been doing for years:doling out ruinous punishments for meaningless traces.    
Report to moderator   Logged
tonymfan
Guest

« Reply #23 on: March 20, 2007, 01:17:26 PM »

Re: Dr. Waterman's statement:

He seems to be quite concerned about the guilty(if there are any)escaping punishment but is completely unconcernerd about punishing the innocent.

If there are both accidental and nefarious aminorex positives,in all probability,the nefarious ones would have a much larger concentration.But the authorities don't want to consider this because it admits the fallacy of what they've been doing for years:doling out ruinous punishments for meaningless traces.   

There's no such thing as meaningless trace of a Class I drug. Class I drugs have no business in horses at all. Except "environmental contamination"  Roll Eyes
Report to moderator   Logged
Doug Frosch
Newbie
*
Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: March 20, 2007, 02:38:54 PM »

It looks like you might be feeling a little "TRUCULENT" also.

tres bien!

bounteous, is more more like it.

adieu
« Last Edit: March 20, 2007, 02:43:56 PM by Doug Frosch » Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: March 20, 2007, 03:06:14 PM »

There's no such thing as meaningless trace of a Class I drug. Class I drugs have no business in horses at all. Except "environmental contamination"  Roll Eyes
There are meaningless amounts of class 1 drugs in Lake Michigan.There are trace amounts of class 1 drugs on many of the bills we use as money.Would you be willing to be punished for the money you have in your pocket?
Report to moderator   Logged
tonymfan
Guest

« Reply #26 on: March 20, 2007, 03:14:09 PM »

There are meaningless amounts of class 1 drugs in Lake Michigan.There are trace amounts of class 1 drugs on many of the bills we use as money.Would you be willing to be punished for the money you have in your pocket?

If my money was in a regulated contest with rules against substances on it I'd make sure I washed it first. Not cry after.

Part of the work the Waterman group was doing is about threshold levels. Anyone know if there's an Aminorex threshold and if Ontario adopted the recomendation?
Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: March 20, 2007, 04:42:29 PM »

Considering the circumstances that led Tony M to decide to never train again (or at least to never be listed again) it seems rather odd that Tonymfan would so blindly support the testing status quo.Your hero concluded that anyone who trained was at risk of suspensions for positives no matter how careful he was.And quit forever because of it.
Report to moderator   Logged
AmyHollar
FREE THE TROLLS!
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1162

I didn't fail gym. I just didn't try to damn hard




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: March 20, 2007, 05:02:27 PM »

by: Tom LaMarra
February 12 2007 Article # 8919

Article Tools



A Louisiana research project that shows racehorses can come into contact with drug residue just about anywhere on the backstretch has some horsemen calling for an end to "zero tolerance" drug-testing policies and creation of a national panel to examine data before inadvertent positives are called.

The study, presented by Steven Barker, PhD, during the National Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Association Medication Committee meeting Feb. 9 in Hot Springs, Ark., revealed small quantities of six drugs were found in samples taken from ship-in stalls, the test barn, and pools of water at Louisiana racetracks. Even dust samples were tested and trace amounts of substances were found.

Barker, the chemist for the Louisiana State Racing Commission who plans to publish his findings, said small amounts of phenylbutazone, flunixin, naproxen, caffeine, furosemide, and cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, were discovered in samples. Flunixin, a widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was the most prevalent, the study showed.

Some drugs were detected from just wiping the interior of stalls.

"We could have gone to other areas of that stall and found other drugs," Barker said during his presentation to horsemen. "Clearly, the backside of a racetrack is heavily contaminated with drugs. Hopefully, you're scared."

With highly sensitive testing methods and zero-tolerance policies, a trainer could be charged with a positive for having one molecule of a substance in a sample, Barker said. Other potential sources of trace amounts of drugs are feed, pasture grasses, improper handling of samples, and mistakes by veterinarians, he said.

Barker said even with precautions in stable areas, drug residue wouldn't be eliminated. Therefore, he said threshold levels for drugs are a necessity.

"First of all, we need to abolish the concept of zero tolerance," Barker said. "It's an over-simplified attempt to regulate drugs. There's no sense to continue that nonsense. You can't eliminate drug contamination, so you have to approach it at the interpretation-of-data end."

Kent Stirling, executive director of the Florida HBPA and chairman of the National HBPA Medication Committee, criticized laboratories and regulators. He said labs get business "by showing regulators they can find things," and regulators "believe any time there is a (positive) it was an attempt by the trainer to compromise a race. A lot of people judge labs by number of calls."

Stirling said the suggestion of a drug-positive review panel should be taken to the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium for consideration. Barker said the panel would "offer some kind of political cover for the industry to establish better thresholds."

The RMTC is in the process of having research performed to establish threshold levels for almost 50 therapeutic medications. Barker, Stirling, and other said thresholds are important given regulations that don't keep in step with technology.

Barker claimed about 80% of drug positives fall under the category of having no impact on a horse outside of 24 hours. "These comments I've heard that any level (of a substance) could potentially have an impact on performance ... oh, crap."

In another presentation, Thomas Tobin, MVB, PhD, Dipl. ABT, of the University of Kentucky discussed caffeine and its metabolites. Tobin, an adviser to the National HBPA, noted the variation in threshold levels for caffeine in various jurisdictions--30 nanograms per milliliter in urine in Hong Kong to 1,000 nanograms per milliliter in Canada.

"Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance on earth," said Tobin, who is continuing to research the drug. "It's a hunting license for a chemist."

Robert Lewis, DVM, a former president of the American Association of Equine Practitioners and currently the organization's representative on the RMTC, said the RMTC has been effective at getting people to focus on the issues. He cited the group's recommendation to regulate steroids, an action he called proactive.

"The RMTC at first had competing agendas, but no one group dominated," Lewis said. "It has been a largely educational process. It has been rewarding to watch the evolution."

As for Barker's research project, Lewis said it should be presented to the RMTC.

"It opens everybody's eyes to hear this kind of material," Lewis said. "I think it takes peer pressure from the leaders of this industry to get the attention of regulators in these different states. The disparity in the way labs in this country handle post-race samples has been a huge problem."
Report to moderator   Logged

Do you want cream with that cup of shut the hell up?
the DailyDaley
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1392




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: March 20, 2007, 05:11:05 PM »

Very nice article Amy dude. Unfortunately I didn't see aminorex listed, but maybe they weren't looking for it. Come to think of it, has there been ANY AMINOREX positives in cajun country.

I don't think so.

Thank you - Amy
Report to moderator   Logged
tonymfan
Guest

« Reply #30 on: March 20, 2007, 06:05:23 PM »

Very nice article Amy dude. Unfortunately I didn't see aminorex listed, but maybe they weren't looking for it.

All of the drugs listed were common therapeutics. None were class I.
Report to moderator   Logged
Doug Frosch
Newbie
*
Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: March 22, 2007, 06:06:29 AM »

Good Morning Double D,

How have you been.  Pretty quiet huh.  doh
Report to moderator   Logged
Doug Frosch
Newbie
*
Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: March 26, 2007, 12:33:12 PM »

Double D,

How is that "nefarious" slant on the aminorex thing working out. crossedfingers

My Data is solid as a ROCK. Lets just wait and see.  dude

 doh doh doh doh doh doh doh doh doh doh doh
Report to moderator   Logged
the DailyDaley
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1392




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: March 26, 2007, 10:01:36 PM »

Let's see.

The common thread.

Belcher, Aboid, Mulrooney, Spence, Sokol - treated by a common vet?

Marvin Goldberg - Speed Shop -

Freedom Health - Succeed -

Self serving test results -

Excused from Pa racing -

Testified at Jenny's hearing in Harrisburg Pa and acknowledge RESPONSIBILITY-

Now who might that party be dude.

Report to moderator   Logged
Doug Frosch
Newbie
*
Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: March 27, 2007, 12:45:51 AM »

Let's see.

The common thread.

Belcher, Aboid, Mulrooney, Spence, Sokol - treated by a common vet?Did Belcers Vet work until 2002 then in 2005,Never Have worked on an Aboid Trained horse, Mulrooney and I were Partners, Never have worked on a Spence horse, Have done minimal work for Sokol none in the past 2 1/2 years

Marvin Goldberg - Speed Shop - Ended my time with Equirace in August 2001

Freedom Health - Succeed - VP Veterinary Affairs, 2004 to current, Excellent product I might add.

Self serving test results -Self Serving only because idiots like you have accused me of it for 2 years now. What are you going to say when all the commissions back this finding. Wait let me guess, I bought them off.

Excused from Pa racing - What Moron told you that. Have never served 1 day suspension in my life in Pa. or anywhere else for that matter

Testified at Jenny's hearing in Harrisburg Pa and acknowledge RESPONSIBILITY-That is correct. Is there something illegal about that.

Now who might that party be-Your guess is as good as mine. By the way any word from the OSRC,ORC or the Pa.HRC about these "Aminorex Positives"
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.439 seconds with 16 queries.

Home
Upcoming events
Breeders' Cup
Horse slaughter in IL
Racing TV schedule
News Updates
Legislation

Galloping Out

Previous stories

Arlington
Balmoral
Hawthorne
Maywood
Chicago Sun-Times
Chicago Tribune
Blood-Horse
Daily Racing Form
Thoroughbred Times
Harness Link
Illinois Racing Board

 

2014

Breeders' Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2013

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2012

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

More ebay items

 

Home | News Updates | Bloggers | Forums | Search
Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Advertising | Contact Us

Copyright © 2000-2014 Chicago Barn to Wire. All rights reserved.
Privacy policy