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Author Topic: Aminorex continues to plague harness racing  (Read 4073 times)
tonymfan
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« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2007, 10:30:04 AM »

I think the "sweep in London" he's talking about is the Bill Robinson bust, not something new. Western Fair Raceway is in London, and they reportedly seized five syringes and a substance.

That makes sense.
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AmyHollar
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« Reply #26 on: March 09, 2007, 10:53:56 AM »

http://www.theharnessedge.com/news.asp?Mod...amp;Story=19499


My wife and I own the filly Sweet Notion. She is trained by Ben Wallace and has been named as testing positive for Aminorex after her win at Flamboro Downs on February 23, 2007.

Realizing that our industry can be an ideal incubator for news, rumour and innuendo, I feel it is necessary to lay bare the facts as I know them and to make clear my position on this situation.

I purchased my first Standardbred in 1960 and over the past 47 years I have owned hundreds of horses. I trained and drove horses professionally for 20 years. I have never trained or owned a horse that has had a positive test until Sweet Notion.

Ben Wallace has intermittently trained horses for me for 17 years. I know him to be a consummate professional, a man of integrity, a hard worker whose honesty is unquestioned. In 35 years as a trainer, Ben has an enviable record. One minor incident with a Class IV substance in December 2006, otherwise, a spotless sheet while training a large stable.

On February 23, 2007 Sweet Notion won the 11th race at Flamboro Downs. She had been entered four weeks earlier in the February Freeze sale conducted by Standardbred Canada and held at Western Fair on February 25, 2007. She was subsequently sold for $11,000 and was bought by Mark Etsell.

Ben Wallace was notified on Monday, March 5, 2007 that Sweet Notion had tested positive for Aminorex. He called to inform me later that day. On Tuesday morning March 6, 2007, Ben and I met with Dr. Mike Weber, CPMA research director, in order to learn more about the Aminorex question. He asked Ben to supply all additives given to Sweet Notion, in order to test them. I took everything to him later that morning.

Sweet Notion was being actively treated for issues relating to previous sickness, treatments to help breathing, increase immunity, combat possible allergies, and reduce inflammation. All these supplements and medications were helping to make a healthier race horse and were done by or under the supervision of Dr Kimber Beimler, the veterinarian for the Wallace Stable. There is absolutely no question in my mind that Ben Wallace or his staff would never give a horse medication except under a veterinarian directive.

On Wednesday, March 7, 2007, I contacted Mark Etsell and we decided to make the sale null and void, with a full refund. The filly will be returned to Ben’s barn where she will receive every supplement and treatment in order to duplicate the circumstances leading to the February 23, 2007 race. She will then be retested under ORC supervision.

All this said, the fact remains that the CPMA has called a positive for Sweet Notion. I have no basis to dispute the findings. I know from attending various meetings and conferences during the period when I was OHHA President, the CPMA and Dr. Mike Weber are considered leaders in the world in battling illegal drugs and have an excellent reputation.

The ORC have acted consistently by notifying the trainers and tracks about the positive tests and vigorously investigating prior to a hearing. I know personally all but one person on the ORC. They are all dedicated, knowledgeable individuals who will do the right thing. I support the trainer responsibility rule even with its systemic flaws. I have been part of many debates and committees in past years in the discussion of the fairness of this rule, but no one could put forward a suitable replacement.

I support WEG and David Wilmot in the pursuit of making harness racing the cleanest of the clean, even using “Private Property” rights or mandatory retention when required. Let’s be clear, solving the drug issue (regardless of the outcome of this Aminorex fiasco) is critical to the survival of our industry.

There is no doubt that as an industry, we are in a battle for our future. Let the ORC, WEG, CPMA do their work. OHHA, SBOA, SC and the rest of us should be encouraging them and cooperating in any way possible to dig deeper, get answers, punish wrong doers and exonerate the innocent.

This business/sport is full of wonderful, salt of the earth people, the kind that give our country and industry its strength. Morale is low but now is the time to pull together, stand up and be as tough as we want our horses to be.
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AmyHollar
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« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2007, 07:18:52 PM »

Goodrow Scratches Horse

March 9, 2007

In light of the uncertainty surrounding the Aminorex positives showing up in Ontario horses, Dr. David Goodrow has scratched a horse that was set to race tonight.

San Siro Lane, owned by David Goodrow Stable of Cambridge, Ont., has been scratched from tonight's seventh race at Woodbine Racetrack.

"Simple arithmetic says that every horse has a one in 75 chance of testing positive," Goodrow told Trot Insider today. "I'm not willing to take that risk and I'm not willing to have my trainer take that chance."

Goodrow came up with his one in 75 probability based on a calculation of positives in relation to the number of tests he believes were conducted.

He said as of today, he would stop racing horses in Ontario until there is some progress on the issue.

Although early on in the progression of Aminorex positives Goodrow told Trot Insider he thought a sheep wormer might be causing the positive tests, he says his discussions with industry experts have convinced him that what is being picked up in the horses is, in fact, traces of Aminorex.

Like many others, however, Goodrow remains puzzled about the origin of the drug and is committed to helping experts discover that origin.

"Everyone is trying to come to the bottom of this and we do all want fair and clean racing," said Goodrow. "There is going to come a time where there needs to be a cut off point where the CPMA, ORC and WEG have to say 'okay, we need to take a step back.'

"I think we need to go to the Pennsylvania situation and say 'we've got an issue here, let's investigate but not take peoples' livelihoods away while we do it."
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talking head
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« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2007, 08:15:27 PM »

Isn't sheep wormer used to cover up other drugs in horses? Wasnt Bob B. in Ohio using it to cover up certain illegal drugs?
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winpick
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« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2007, 09:54:15 PM »

There is obviously something wrong with the testing. There is no possible way that any trainer with half a brain would be giving this drug after the publicity from the first few positives.
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DLeestable
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« Reply #30 on: March 09, 2007, 10:13:26 PM »

There is obviously something wrong with the testing. There is no possible way that any trainer with half a brain would be giving this drug after the publicity from the first few positives. 


 I am with you....said this all along. You would have to be braindead to use this drug right now.

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winpick
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« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2007, 12:09:00 AM »

Are you the Lee Dee stable from northfield? Anyways, this whole thing is ridiculous. It did not happen. If I'm a trainer and I know I'm gonna get caught, Why not just give them some etorphine? I know people do what they have to do to stay competitive, but no one is going to throw away a career for an obvious positive test. It reminds me of Dover Downs, are you trying to tell me that Josh Green, Chuck Crissman, and plenty of others are going to risk careers to give a milkshake? Again something wrong with the testing, any trainer, honest or not is smart enough to stay away from a sure positive.
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Fillmore Bear
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« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2007, 12:17:00 AM »

If I was a successful (or even semi-pro) trainer,I'd quit racing in Ontario immediately and indefinitely.
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