Chicago Barn to Wire
Home | News | Bloggers | Forums | Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Contact Us | Search


November 21, 2014, 11:59:45 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you don't remember your password, email me.

New  registration procedures -- Some ISPs have been bouncing the verification emails.  Please email me to be activated or if you have any problems.  Click Contact Us above.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Selecting a trainer.....  (Read 5403 times)
Titus Colt
Newbie
*
Posts: 14




Ignore
« on: October 30, 2006, 10:35:11 AM »

Although it may be a "dead game," I had a question about the process of hiring a trainer.  I am thinking about getting into the "business" in the next few months and was thinking of claiming a 15K-20K claimer.  Realistically, what trainers could I have access to?  What are the true monthly costs (everything included) of a decent trainer?  Thanks for any information. 

Titus Colt


Report to moderator   Logged
burton
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 14674




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2006, 10:38:28 AM »

Although it may be a "dead game," I had a question about the process of hiring a trainer.  I am thinking about getting into the "business" in the next few months and was thinking of claiming a 15K-20K claimer.  Realistically, what trainers could I have access to?  What are the true monthly costs (everything included) of a decent trainer?  Thanks for any information. 

Titus Colt



Make sure your trainer doesn't post on here.
Make sure your trainer doesn't have a loud mouthed brother who posts on here as well.
Report to moderator   Logged
County Fair Racing
Full Member
***
Posts: 132




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2006, 10:46:07 AM »

Do you know any trainers personally?  Do you have certain trainers in mind that you would be interested in contacting?
Report to moderator   Logged
BuckeyeWon
Newbie
*
Posts: 27




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2006, 10:48:15 AM »

Where are you located at?  R u racing in Chicago or somewhere else?
Report to moderator   Logged

Clear Eyes! Full Heart! Can't Lose!
Grinder
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2136




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2006, 11:44:41 AM »

Costs vary geographically.  As do the candidates.  Need to know where you are going to race, for anyone to comment.
Report to moderator   Logged

The more you bet...the more you win
The Panderosa
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 386




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2006, 11:51:35 AM »

Around Chicago it's about 40 bucks a day.  Around 1200 a month with shipping and everything.  Give or take some.
Report to moderator   Logged
edwardwilliam
Annnnnnnnnd they're off!
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 6252

Rebate shops are not the devil.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2006, 12:10:56 PM »

Around Chicago it's about 40 bucks a day.  Around 1200 a month with shipping and everything.  Give or take some.

For my personal experience, I would count on it costing you around $1,750 to $2,000 a month.

Best,
EW
Report to moderator   Logged

Stick to Fantasyland pal, because you'll NEVER make it in the real world - TC
The Panderosa
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 386




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2006, 12:22:29 PM »

With a lot of vet bills maybe...
Report to moderator   Logged
swaymi
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 620




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2006, 12:52:43 PM »

first  you have to look at the whole picture and realize what you are about to get in.. do you have 20000 to play with or do you have 30000 to play with you have to remember if you have 20000 then don't go out there and claim one for 20000 because in 30 days your going to get a bill for about 1500 or so and do you want to dip back into your account and get more money. what i suggest to do is maybe claim one for 15000 put 5000 into an account so now you have three months of bills put up and you have 90 days to make something happen.  when you are tying to find a trainer that is the most important part of this you need to find someone you can trust and have confidence in. go see how they take care of there horses in the morning or maybe see how there horses look like in the warm up and post parades. talk to one of there owners ask all the questions you need to know and always make the last decision its your money. choose a trainer that produces...
Report to moderator   Logged
Fillmore Bear
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1293




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2006, 01:14:36 PM »

     My advice to anyone with NO backstrtch connections or experience is to start with a really cheap horse.You
are likely to learn a lot of things the hard way and it's much less expensive if you start with a cheap horse.
     Also if you are new to the business get a trainer who has the time and willingness to TALK TO YOU.

     Even if you are an experienced and knowledgeable BETTOR, OWNING is a whole new world.
Report to moderator   Logged
sn
Guest

« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2006, 01:17:53 PM »

Titus, the Swami is giving you bad advice in my opinion!!!

Let me give you some advice that you can take to the bank!!!
I dont care if you put in $1500 of $150,000 go find yourself a trainer that you can call at anytime to find out how your horse is doing one that will always call you back. Then give him your $$$ and say let me know when we can win and call me if theres a problem. Then go home and sit there and let him or her call the shots and make you $$$$. At the end of 6 months re-evalluate your situation if they did a good job for you fine if not make a move. Thats what owners are suppose to do. To many owners get into this buis. thinking they could train there own horses but they dont have a liscense. This is just not true!!! It takes years of expierience to keep your horses on the track concistantly. Its not something you learn from going to the grandstand and watching races and betting. You run into a problem when horses get laid up, the bills seem to never end try to avoid this. VERY INPORTANT!!! remember this, Select a trainer that keeps his horses on the track!!! Even if he or she doesnt win alot but always gets checks and keeps them on the track and looking good. Remember your horses will probally only win maybe 4 or 5 times a year any more than that and you probally wont own him he'll get claimed. There are trainers that live on the edge that have a high win % and make them go faster, these trainers dont get very many starts out of there horses they might win 3 or 4 in a row then they are not around for a while. Dont fall in that trap, you will be the one that will be paying those bills when they are on the shelf. If you can buy a horse for $15,000 or $20,000 and your trainer can get 30 to 40 starts out of your horse in a year, YOU WILL MAKE $$$$ and have some fun, good luck!!!!
Report to moderator   Logged
swaymi
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 620




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2006, 02:18:16 PM »

or you can claim roy olcoot for 12000 and give a guy a profit of 8000 on just the claim and in three months not make any money and say you know what they were doing to make the horse go but not do it because we really didnt know what made the horse go and have him taken away from us and win very next start.
 i would give you 20000 so in three months i dont have anything but a 4000 claimer that once was a 12000 claimer because after 10 years we think we still know what we are doing its just like anything time has passed you team nance just like it did to the neil colemans and scot banks of harness racing wake up and smell the coffee its time to give it up... all you and your brother did was post on here how you knew everything about training a horse and all you did was make nothing but bad claims and purchasses so what you won a total of three races all nw1 big deal lets see you win some real races before you start giving your bullshit advice of how a trainer is training the horse and not the owner we all know that but racing for checks are over people want to see there horses win races nobody wants to see his horse run fifth and pick up the welfare check anymore those days are over
Report to moderator   Logged
swaymi
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 620




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2006, 02:22:38 PM »

if you get sn to train you will never get a phone call because they never have a shot to win untill they switch barns to jarrod duncan barn..
Report to moderator   Logged
tonymfan
Guest

« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2006, 02:32:48 PM »

Titus, the Swami is giving you bad advice in my opinion!!!

Let me give you some advice that you can take to the bank!!!
I dont care if you put in $1500 of $150,000 go find yourself a trainer that you can call at anytime to find out how your horse is doing one that will always call you back. Then give him your $$$ and say let me know when we can win and call me if theres a problem. Then go home and sit there and let him or her call the shots and make you $$$$.

Not every owner gets into the game wishing to be treated like a mushroom. Some want to learn about the business and expect to get some learning from all that training money.

Good luck finding the mushroom owners you want sn. IMHO it's a dying breed. People today want to know what's going on with their horses.
Report to moderator   Logged
njhorseman
Guest

« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2006, 02:52:09 PM »

first  you have to look at the whole picture and realize what you are about to get in.. do you have 20000 to play with or do you have 30000 to play with you have to remember if you have 20000 then don't go out there and claim one for 20000 because in 30 days your going to get a bill for about 1500 or so and do you want to dip back into your account and get more money. what i suggest to do is maybe claim one for 15000 put 5000 into an account so now you have three months of bills put up and you have 90 days to make something happen.  when you are tying to find a trainer that is the most important part of this you need to find someone you can trust and have confidence in. go see how they take care of there horses in the morning or maybe see how there horses look like in the warm up and post parades. talk to one of there owners ask all the questions you need to know and always make the last decision its your money. choose a trainer that produces...

Overall, good advice.
Report to moderator   Logged
njhorseman
Guest

« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2006, 02:57:27 PM »

     My advice to anyone with NO backstrtch connections or experience is to start with a really cheap horse.You
are likely to learn a lot of things the hard way and it's much less expensive if you start with a cheap horse.
     Also if you are new to the business get a trainer who has the time and willingness to TALK TO YOU.

     Even if you are an experienced and knowledgeable BETTOR, OWNING is a whole new world.

I disagree about starting with a cheap horse. An owner has almost no chance of breaking even, much less making a profit, with a cheap horse. A 4 claimer costs just as much to feed and train as a 20 claimer, and its vet bills may even be higher because he's likely to have more physical problems.

I'm not suggesting to go out and spend $100,000 on your first horse, but you're better off spending $15 to 20 K, so you can have a horse that races for enough purse money to give you a shot at making money.
Report to moderator   Logged
the DailyDaley
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1392




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: October 30, 2006, 03:05:41 PM »

Not sure what order you would put this in, but these are most important.

1. Get a group (lets say 5 people) put up $10,000 a piece. This way you get more bang for your buck and you are not stuck with the whole pie.

2. Find a track where the horses are racing at. Do not buy hoping to switch tracks to a different trainer.

3. Do your research as to who the helpers are and who isn't. You will not improve one from a "BOTTLE TRAINER". Unless your trainer is "PART of THE GANG".

4. It is much easier to meet bills with 3 or 4 racing. 1 or 2 might be laid up or not racing well. The other 2 or 3 can carry the load of expenses.

5. Do you need to be hands on, NO. But learn to watch warm-ups, watch reruns, know equipment, take notes. Don't fall in love with one and be scared to drop in price. Racing over your head only creates HEADACHES and LARGE BILLS. Nobody is happy that way.

6. I usually stopped by once a week and brought a case of beer (not on race nights). Mid afternnon is usually good. The barn is fairly quiet and the morning routine is over.

This is just getting started. The DD.
Report to moderator   Logged
Mclock
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2139




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2006, 03:11:47 PM »

Although it may be a "dead game," I had a question about the process of hiring a trainer.  I am thinking about getting into the "business" in the next few months and was thinking of claiming a 15K-20K claimer.  Realistically, what trainers could I have access to?  What are the true monthly costs (everything included) of a decent trainer?  Thanks for any information. 

Titus Colt




I'll give you my advice, for what it's worth.
#1  choose a trainer who shows up to the barn everyday
#2  choose a trainer who pays his help with good checks - not checks from a closed acct. so then the help quits and the owner has to muck the stalls.
#3  choose a trainer who pays his bills at the tack shop and the blacksmith so you can get supplies and get your horse shod without a problem.
#4  choose a trainer who pays the feed man/women so your horse don't have to go several days without food.
#5  choose a trainer who does not try to sell your horse to 10 other different people and takes deposits from them people and never produces a horse for them.
#6  choose a trainer who will not charge you obscene amounts of money for something that another owner has already paid for.
#7  choose a trainer who will not slice your hopples and them cover it with tape when you leave his barn, this could seriously hurt the horse/driver/trainer and other people and horses around.
Report to moderator   Logged

'Tis better to be silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.
Sullivan
Guest

« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2006, 03:12:56 PM »

I'll give you my advice, for what it's worth.
#1  choose a trainer who shows up to the barn everyday
#2  choose a trainer who pays his help with good checks - not checks from a closed acct. so then the help quits and the owner has to muck the stalls.
#3  choose a trainer who pays his bills at the tack shop and the blacksmith so you can get supplies and get your horse shod without a problem.
#4  choose a trainer who pays the feed man/women so your horse don't have to go several days without food.
#5  choose a trainer who does not try to sell your horse to 10 other different people and takes deposits from them people and never produces a horse for them.
#6  choose a trainer who will not charge you obscene amounts of money for something that another owner has already paid for.
#7  choose a trainer who will not slice your hopples and them cover it with tape when you leave his barn, this could seriously hurt the horse/driver/trainer and other people and horses around.

So basically, Scott Nance is not a good choice for a trainer?
Report to moderator   Logged
njhorseman
Guest

« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2006, 03:13:41 PM »

Not sure what order you would put this in, but these are most important.

1. Get a group (lets say 5 people) put up $10,000 a piece. This way you get more bang for your buck and you are not stuck with the whole pie.

2. Find a track where the horses are racing at. Do not buy hoping to switch tracks to a different trainer.

3. Do your research as to who the helpers are and who isn't. You will not improve one from a "BOTTLE TRAINER". Unless your trainer is "PART of THE GANG".

4. It is much easier to meet bills with 3 or 4 racing. 1 or 2 might be laid up or not racing well. The other 2 or 3 can carry the load of expenses.

5. Do you need to be hands on, NO. But learn to watch warm-ups, watch reruns, know equipment, take notes. Don't fall in love with one and be scared to drop in price. Racing over your head only creates HEADACHES and LARGE BILLS. Nobody is happy that way.

6. I usually stopped by once a week and brought a case of beer (not on race nights). Mid afternnon is usually good. The barn is fairly quiet and the morning routine is over.

This is just getting started. The DD.

Overall, this is also good advice...but I usually brought coffee, donuts and bagels to the barn in the morning, not beer in the afternoon. Wink
Report to moderator   Logged
TC
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4183




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: October 30, 2006, 03:15:55 PM »

I'll give you my advice, for what it's worth.
#1  choose a trainer who shows up to the barn everyday
#2  choose a trainer who pays his help with good checks - not checks from a closed acct. so then the help quits and the owner has to muck the stalls.
#3  choose a trainer who pays his bills at the tack shop and the blacksmith so you can get supplies and get your horse shod without a problem.
#4  choose a trainer who pays the feed man/women so your horse don't have to go several days without food.
#5  choose a trainer who does not try to sell your horse to 10 other different people and takes deposits from them people and never produces a horse for them.
#6  choose a trainer who will not charge you obscene amounts of money for something that another owner has already paid for.
#7  choose a trainer who will not slice your hopples and them cover it with tape when you leave his barn, this could seriously hurt the horse/driver/trainer and other people and horses around.

Please give us a name OL' Chum! TC
Report to moderator   Logged
Sullivan
Guest

« Reply #21 on: October 30, 2006, 03:18:00 PM »

Please give us a name OL' Chum! TC

TC,

Would you list 4-5 trainers you would reccomend for this prospective owner? 
Report to moderator   Logged
TC
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4183




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2006, 03:18:17 PM »

So basically, Scott Nance is not a good choice for a trainer?

Sounds like liable too me! I'll check with the former "esteemed poster" JD. TC
Report to moderator   Logged
Sullivan
Guest

« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2006, 03:19:28 PM »

Sounds like liable too me! I'll check with the former "esteemed poster" JD. TC

Liable?  You mean Libel? 
Report to moderator   Logged
Mclock
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2139




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2006, 03:23:09 PM »

Sounds like liable too me! I'll check with the former "esteemed poster" JD. TC

yeah with his 159  I Q he can't spell simple words......sounds like a fatass scumbag Timmy who sit up stairs......another real winner folks....I find it funny not even 1 single person has ever defended this scumbag.....but I do know why.
                                                                   
Report to moderator   Logged

'Tis better to be silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.
Pages: [1] 2 3 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.237 seconds with 16 queries.

Home
Upcoming events
Breeders' Cup
Horse slaughter in IL
Racing TV schedule
News Updates
Legislation

Galloping Out

Previous stories

Arlington
Balmoral
Hawthorne
Maywood
Chicago Sun-Times
Chicago Tribune
Blood-Horse
Daily Racing Form
Thoroughbred Times
Harness Link
Illinois Racing Board

 

2014

Breeders' Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2013

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

2012

Breeders' Cup
Hawthorne Gold Cup
Arlington Million
Triple Crown
Illinois Derby

More ebay items

 

Home | News Updates | Bloggers | Forums | Search
Resources | Links | Marketplace | Gallery | Advertising | Contact Us

Copyright © 2000-2014 Chicago Barn to Wire. All rights reserved.
Privacy policy